reference/misc blog

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2020-07-03 12:42:38

    As a college student, currently really hungry with nothing to eat, I understand how hard it can be to get food. Sometimes you really just don’t have the money to eat and when you do, you waste it all on fast food instead of stocking up on cheap things because you’re so tired of Ramen Noodes and canned food you could barf. So, I’ve composed a list of recipes and resources that will fit a college kid’s budget and appetite. Don’t go hungry! <3

    Ramen Noodle Recipes:

  • Ramen Noodle Stir Fry
  • Sirloin-Snap Pea Stir Fry
  • Chicken Noodle Soup
  • Chili Cheese Ramen
  • Egg Drop Ramen
  • Spinach and Ramen
  • Ramen Spaghetti
  • Ramen Alfredo
  • Cheesy Ramen Noodles
  • Mug Meals:

  • Cheesy Eggs Mug
  • Cheese and Broccoli Mug
  • Mac and Cheese in a Mug
  • Meatloaf in a Mug
  • Nutella Mug Cake
  • Cheesecake Mug
  • Coffee Cup Quiche
  • Coffee Cup Chilaquiles
  • Mug Egg Scramble
  • Microwave Recipes:

  • Potato Chips
  • Corn on the cob
  • Scalloped Potatoes
  • White Rice
  • Fried Rice
  • Baked Potato
  • Chicken Casserole 
  • Garlic Chicken
  • Chicken Soup Casserole
  • Caramelized Onion Baked Potato
  • Soft Chicken Tacos
  • Pancakes
  • Recipe Generators

  • My Fridge Food
  • Fire House Chef
  • Dinner in 15 Minutes
  • Advanced recipe Generator
  • Cuisine
  • Recipe Matcher
  • Super Cook
  • Recipe Puppy
  • Cook Thing
  • Recipes by Ingredient
  • Recipe Key
  • Not Beans Again
  • Ideas 4 Recipes
  • Big Oven
  • Other Resources

  • Actual College Student Cookbook
  • Restaurant Coupons [1] [2] [3] [4]
  • Free Birthday food [1] [2
  • Reblogging because lord knows college kids aren’t the only ones that are broke.

    atac-wolfe

    Reblogging because “broke” tips also convey extremely well to Survival tips.

    Learn to make something outta nothing.

    Reblogging for reference because I suspect I might be broker now than I was in university.

    dailylifewithchronicillness

    Because it might be helpful for spoonies on a budget!

    anonymous

    maybe a fun question but i'm genuinely curious as to what your favorite font pairings are !

    it  is  fun<> <> !  here’s  a  few  i  like  as  well  as  some  bsides  from  the  play  album 

    image
    image

    red  velvet  + times  new  roman

    image

    prestige  signatur+ roboto  condensed  (  in  bold  italic  )

    image
    image

    sunday  mornin+ montserrat  (  in  light  )

    How do you (“how does one”) shop for a therapist?

    Can you call up a therapist and be like “hi, I’m therapist shopping”? Can you schedule an appointment with a therapist and then be like “actually I have some questions and I want to spend part of this appointment talking about your practice and whether or not it is garbage?”? Are you expected to phone interview/screen your therapists if you are shopping around for a therapist?

    If you’re seeing one therapist are you supposed to/not supposed to tell them if you start seeing another therapist? Is it possible to cheat on your therapist?

    I know this one! Or, at least, I know a way to do it, because I’ve done it.

    1) When you call them up (or email them, which I prefer, because PHONE, EW), you ask if they’re taking new patients.

    2) If they say yes, say something along the lines of “Great! I’m looking for a new therapist. Would it be possible for me to schedule an appointment so we can see whether we’d be a good fit for one another?”

  • IF THEY SAY NO, THEY DON’T DO ‘INTERVIEWS’: they’re a dick, you don’t want them anyway, don’t bother to make an appointment
  • 3) Assuming everything is a go, head over to the appointment. Bring your notebook, pen, and questions. Also, if possible, have a very brief rundown prepared of what you’d like to accomplish with your therapy (or even what you think your biggest issues are).

    4) Introduce yourself. Reiterate that you want to see if the two of you would be a good fit, so [a nice little social laugh or smile here, while holding up your notebook] you brought questions.

  • IF THEY DON’T LIKE THAT: they’re a dick, you don’t want them anyway, cut the meeting short
  • 5) Give the rundown of what you want, what your issues are, whatever. See how they react.

  • IF YOU FEEL WEIRD AT ALL ABOUT THEM: they may not be a dick, but if you don’t feel comfortable with them, then it’s going to be a shit therapeutic relationship
  • 6) Ask your questions — about their therapeutic approach, why they entered the field, whether they feel comfortable working with *your* needs (I, for instance, specifically told my awesome therapist that I needed her to tell me absolutely nothing about her personal life or experiences — as much as possible, I needed a blank wall to bounce things off of. It’s been years now, and I THINK she’s seen at least a couple of episodes of Doctor Who. I THINK. That’s all I’ve got. It’s amazing).

  • AGAIN, IF YOU FEEL WEIRD ABOUT THEM: go with your gut — your therapy is not the time or place to try and soldier through
  • 7) By this point, you’ve probably hit the 45 minute mark, and you’ll know if you want to see this person again.

  • IF YES, say that this was a really great meeting, and you’d like to set up a regular appointment.
  • IF NO, say “Thanks for meeting with me.” If it wasn’t too terrible, feel free to add in whatever social niceties you want to lessen the blow (“I have appointments with a few other people, still, but thank you again!”), or you could just skedaddle as soon as possible.
  • IF YOU’RE NOT SURE, go a bit heavier with the social nicety: “I still have appointments with a few other people, but I really enjoyed our meeting. I’ll let you know as soon as possible if I’d like to schedule another one. Thanks again!”
  • Regarding current therapists: If they’re toxic, get rid of ‘em before you even start interviewing others. Nobody needs that kind of garbage. Otherwise, you could keep seeing them while you interview others, and then the second you find one you like (and you schedule your next appointment), get rid of your current one. You don’t have to say why — just say that you’d like to cancel future appointments. Do it over email, if you want. If you like them, you can tell them that you just need something different now, but that you “really appreciate all the work we’ve done together” or something. If you don’t like them, just cancel. They don’t need to know jack.

  • IF YOUR CURRENT THERAPIST SAYS SHIT ABOUT YOUR LEAVING — and I mean anything other than a positive hope for you in the future — then they were a dick and you were right to find someone else. Who needs passive-aggressive bullshit from a therapist? Nobody, that’s who.
  • So that’s my philosophy/style with regard to therapist shopping — I may be completely wrong, but it’s worked for me so far. Good luck!

    This is really good advice

    Yes, very good advice!

    piefacemcgee

    I needed this!! I recently moved and need to find a new therapist AND psych in my area. I was also super uncomfortable with my therapist, who literally said these words out loud from her mouth: “How do you know you’re pansexual if you’ve never had sex?”

    nope bye

    robotsandmagicalboys

    This is the advice I used when therapist shopping for my current therapist! I didn’t bring the notebook of questions cause there were a just a couple key things that I really wanted to make sure that were okay, but this gave me a good idea of what to look out for not related to the very specific stuff I was going to therapy for. But this guide is awesome.

    I’ve never been so unafraid to see a therapist before I read this… I might give it a try.

    suddenly everyone is hopping on disney’s dick after the launch of disney+. humans as a society need to learn the ultimate truth, piracy.

    spideysbff

    me @people who sign up for online streaming services. rip to y'all but im poor.

    spideysbff

    gowatchseries.com, 123movies, fmovies, bmovies. i hope nobody reblogs this addition. :/

    spideysbff

    hi my name is capitalist and you’re streaming capitalism ✨

    NOBODY use levidia.ch IT HAS PRACTICALLY EVERYTHING so DO NOT ACCESS IT BY MISTAKE and END UP COSTING THESE MEGACORPS MONEY

    PSA.

    spideysbff

    and do not type name of any movie on google followed by google docs because you can find almost all movies like that. so do not

    watchseries.movie DOES NOT update episodes with a few hours of release it DOES NOT have subtitles available with the day and DOES NOT also have movies

    Couchtuner is also totally not a great spot for a lot of tv series just so everybody knows they shouldn’t bother to check it out.

    Flixtor.to is definitely not my go-to for same day HD uploads of new shows including both Disney+and HBO exclusives

    Okay but let’s not sleep on the king of them all, fucking Putlocker has every movie that came out this year and 99% are in HD a week after their release.

    If anyone is HYPOTHETICALLY thinking about downloading movies or tv shows I WOULD recommend the use of a vpn so megacorps can’t find you, but that’s fucked up to them and you should totally not do that Also, when HYPOTHETICALLY using a vpn, make sure the servers you use are not in America (ASSUMING that’s where you live) because if you ALLEGEDLY pirate movies and tv shows illegally, the government can and will go to your HYPOTHETICAL vpn provider and check your downloads there

    REBLOGGING THIS SO PEOPLE KNOW EXACTLY WHAT <>NOT TO DO WHEN STUCK IN QUARANTINE AND BORED OUT OF THEIR MINDS

    tips for improving reading comprehension / cutting through brain fog / dealing with a language processing disorder

    aka I tried paying attention to what I do when reading a text & here’s what I came up with

  • <>make sure you know what pronouns, & other terms that are in reference to something else, are referring to. look earlier in the sentence or paragraph to find the referents of words like “it,” “that,” “these,” “which,” “they,” etc. insert the referent back into the sentence if you need to. if there’s a sentence that doesn’t seem to make sense, it may be because you’ve been assuming the wrong referent. remember that the referent may sometimes occur after the pronoun.
  • <>pay special attention to words that explain relationships between things, facts, or ideas. words and phrases such as “similarly,” “however,” “although,” “still,” “in contrast,” “despite,” etc. will help you understand how a writer wants a proposition to be evaluated in relation to something that’s already been stated–as evidence, as a counterpoint, as something in tension or in accordance with something else, etc.
  • <>map things out spatially. things being contrasted are further apart from each other in your mental space, one thing that leads to or causes another is an arrow pointing in a given direction, something that’s a subgroup of something else is a circle within a circle, and so on. your system may be similar to or different than this.
  • <>if a parenthetical aside breaks up a sentence and you can’t pick the thread of it back up, try reading and understanding the sentence up through the aside, then removing the aside and just reading the first and second parts of the sentence as if there were no interruption. read the aside afterwards.
  • <>once you think you’ve understood the general idea of what a sentence, paragraph, or essay is about, go back and read it again, keeping the main point in mind, and ask yourself how everything you read contributes to that point. if you’re having trouble with certain parts of a text, this will probably help you pick up more detail the second time around.
  • <>if you’re having trouble processing a clause, try forging ahead and finishing the sentence–you may have been parsing something incorrectly based on incomplete information, & the remaining bit of the sentence could clear that up.
  • <>keep track of any confusion or questions that you have as you read and see if they’re resolved or answered later in the text.
  • <>read a difficult sentence aloud if you’re having trouble parsing it–forcing yourself to take note of the prosodic contours of a sentence may help you with its syntax, since prosodic cues such as pauses and rising or falling intonation often correspond with syntactic boundaries.
  • <>restructure sentences or space them out differently, either mentally or using word processing software, in whatever way makes it easier for you to understand them (e.g. breaking longer sentences up or combining shorter sentences, making parentheticals into their own sentences, etc.)
  • <>have provision for just saying ‘this is poorly written’. some writers are very bad at making the referents of their pronouns clear, make a lot of errors of verb/preposition collocation, use conjunctive adverbs (e.g. ”however”) in ways that don’t make sense to describe the relationship between the two points that they’re making, &c. correct the sentence, read it back through again, and move on
  • <>take a break. if you’ve been reading for a while you might be too tired or frustrated to make sense of something, or you may be too determined to parse a sentence (especially a syntactically or semantically ambiguous one) in a way that doesn’t make sense. come back when you have a clearer mind.
  • Black Feminism & Abolition

    if you want to actually engage with<> intersectional feminism & what<> abolition really means, this is your homework:

    <>Angela Davis - “Are Prisons Obsolete<>?”

    <>Ruth Wilson Gilmore - “Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing Californ<>ia”

    Angela Davis - “Abolition Democracy”

    Angela Davis - “Freedom is a Constant Struggle”

    <>“If They Come in the Morning… Voices of Resista<>nce”

    Carole Boyce Davies - “Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones”

    Safiya Bukhari - “The War Before”

    Patrice Douglass - “Black Feminist Theory for the Dead and Dying”

    Patrice Douglass & Frank B Wilderson - “The Violence of Presence: Metaphysics in a Blackened World”

    <>“Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect<>?”

    Evelyn Hammond - “Black (W)holes and the Geometry of Black Female Sexuality”

    Sadiya Hartman - “Seduction and the Ruses of Power”

    Sadiya Hartman - “Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route”

    <>Audre Lorde - “Sister Outsider”

    Audre Lorde - “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House”

    bell hooks - “The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators”

    <>Michelle S Jacobs - “Black Women’s Invisible Struggle Against Police Viol<>ence”

    Claudia Rankine - Citizen

    <>Assata Shakur - “Women in Prison: How We Are”

    Assata Shakur - “Assata: An Autobiography”

    <>Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor - “How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collectiv<>e”

    Zoe Samudzi & William C Anderson - “As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation”

    this is a curated list of texts that i find the most helpful for illustrating why<> we all should also be abolitionists. the bolded are the ones i’ve found the most helpful thus far. & reminder to buy the books when you can, preferably from independent / leftist / black-owned bookstores… and see what you can find at your local library! keep these works in circulation!

    i was re-reading “how to talk so little kids will listen” earlier today, and it reminded me of how much of our culture is so thorou<>ghly punitive – every facet of the way we behave, and expect others to behave, is connected by the conc<>ept of punishment. there has been a r<>ise in respectful parenting theory in the past 40-ish years that goes directly against this punitive parenting style.

    i have some books that have helped me with <>respectful parenting here:

    https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/2168390?shelf=parenting

    something i was thinking in my re-read of this book earlier today is how my first impulse while parenting tends to be a reactionary, punitive impulse. sure, you might be patient when the kid is being cute and you have lots of energy. but on an off day? you have to fight against what you’ve learned. even if the kid does something incredibly naughty.

    i was reminded of a time when my kid was left alone with the cat, and she started rubbing lotion all over the cat. i think she thought she was doing something nice for her; she was only 2.5 at the time. when i saw the cat, my anxiety spiked. i spoke to her sternly and had her help me clean up the cat, but i was wracked with fear and nervousness – “oh no, what if the cat licks herself and gets sick? what if the cat dies? what if the cat dies because of what my kid did?” i started to feel like just talking to my kid about it wasn’t enough… should we say, “time out”? no dessert? no more cat? no more trips to the bakery? i promised myself i would never spank, but inside, there was a part of me that felt like spanking!! that’s what my parents did!

    but after i stewed for a while, i came to my senses. my kid was just being a kid. little kids have no impulse control!<> but me?<> i’m an adult, i should have known better! it was really my fault for leaving the kid and the lotion and the cat all together, unsupervised. in a way, m<>y strong reaction to her behavior was just myself projecting the guilt at having a bad parenting moment onto her. 

    how effective is punitive speech, and punitive acts?

    do you think she would have learned something if i had hit her? or locked her in her room? or took away her snacks? (these are not what those in the respectful parenting community would call natural consequences – these are just unconnected punishments, things that have nothing to do with the cat.)

    no. i still would have had a lotioned cat.

    what if i had lectured? yelled? gone on at length about how terribly naughty it was, and what a bad girl she was?

    no. i still would have had a lotioned cat.

    the actual consequence in this instance was for <>me. because i messed up. the natural consequence: now i have to clean up the damn cat and put the lotion where my kid can’t reach it… and supervise the kid more closely, because she’s only a toddler.

    my kid felt bad as soon as she saw how bad i felt. she didn’t show it at the moment – just nervous laughter. but i could tell she felt bad, and sure enough, later that night, she cried about it, and we got to talk more about how the lotion was not good for the cat, and how i was going to put it out of her reach for now.

    and that’s…. enough.

    it really is.

    and it’s so fucking hard to wrap your mind around it. because our entire culture revolves around law and order, crime and punishment! if people mess up, hurt them! lock them away! demolish their self-esteem!

    none of that shit helps anyone. it only feels good as a short-term solution.

    in the long-term? we have to start believing in the inherent preciousness of every life. it will be hard as fuck to change our collective mindset. but we have to do it. because everything is connected to it, from huge things like climate change, all the way down to a little toddler learning how to interact with a cat.

    once you see it, you’ll see the punitive attitude in everything. you’ll see how little it actually fixes. and hopefully you’ll become an abolitionist too.

    Black Feminism & Abolition

    if you want to actually engage with<> intersectional feminism & what<> abolition really means, this is your homework:

    <>Angela Davis - “Are Prisons Obsolete<>?”

    <>Ruth Wilson Gilmore - “Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing Californ<>ia”

    Angela Davis - “Abolition Democracy”

    Angela Davis - “Freedom is a Constant Struggle”

    <>“If They Come in the Morning… Voices of Resista<>nce”

    Carole Boyce Davies - “Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones”

    Safiya Bukhari - “The War Before”

    Patrice Douglass - “Black Feminist Theory for the Dead and Dying”

    Patrice Douglass & Frank B Wilderson - “The Violence of Presence: Metaphysics in a Blackened World”

    <>“Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect<>?”

    Evelyn Hammond - “Black (W)holes and the Geometry of Black Female Sexuality”

    Sadiya Hartman - “Seduction and the Ruses of Power”

    Sadiya Hartman - “Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route”

    <>Audre Lorde - “Sister Outsider”

    Audre Lorde - “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House”

    bell hooks - “The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators”

    <>Michelle S Jacobs - “Black Women’s Invisible Struggle Against Police Viol<>ence”

    Claudia Rankine - Citizen

    <>Assata Shakur - “Women in Prison: How We Are”

    Assata Shakur - “Assata: An Autobiography”

    <>Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor - “How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collectiv<>e”

    Zoe Samudzi & William C Anderson - “As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation”

    this is a curated list of texts that i find the most helpful for illustrating why<> we all should also be abolitionists. the bolded are the ones i’ve found the most helpful thus far. & reminder to buy the books when you can, preferably from independent / leftist / black-owned bookstores… and see what you can find at your local library! keep these works in circulation!

    i put together a list of readings on <>the history of agriculture, food & food justice in black communities in america that i’ve been working through, thought i’d share it here in case others are interested:

    <>articles/lists

  • “Black Communities Have Always Used Food as Protest” by Amethyst Ganaway
  • “Restaurants Must Use This Moment to Change, Too” by Amethyst Ganaway
  • “Cooking Up Change: How Food Helped Fuel The Civil Rights Movement” by Nancy Schute
  • “How to Eat to Live: Black Nationalism and the Post-1964 Culinary Turn” by Jennifer Jensen Wallach
  • “There were nearly a million black farmers in 1920. Why have they disappeared?” by Summer Sewell
  • “The Great Land Robbery: The shameful story of how 1 million black families have been ripped from their farms” by Vann R. Newkirk II
  • “Their Family Bought Land One Generation After Slavery. The Reels Brothers Spent Eight Years in Jail for Refusing to Leave It.” by Lizzie Presser
  • @/NFUDC (National Farmers Union): How to fight racism in agriculture (twitter thread dated June 2, 2020)
  • Want to See Food and Land Justice for Black Americans? Support These Groups.
  • 21 Individuals and Organizations Building Stronger Black Communities and Food Systems
  • <>books (**full text available for free)

  • **Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement by Monica M. White
  • **Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class, and Sustainability ed. Alison Hope Alkon and Julian Agyeman
  • **Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C. by Ashanté M. Reese
  • **Dispossession: Discrimination against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights by Peter Daniel
  • The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South by Michael W. Twitty
  • Building Houses Out of Chicken Legs: Black Women, Food, and Power by Psyche A. Williams-Forson
  • In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World by Judith A. Carney & Black Rice by Judith A. Carney
  • Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning by Rafia Zafar
  • Southern Food and Civil Rights: Feeding the Revolution by Frederick Douglass Opie
  • Every Nation Has Its Dish: Black Bodies and Black Food in Twentieth-Century America by Jennifer Jensen Wallach
  • Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America by Marcia Chatelain
  • Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land by Leah Penniman
  • <>podcasts / television

  • <>Sporkful When White People Say Plantation & When Black Chefs Created Plantation Food
  • <>The Kitchen Sisters / Hidden Kitchens Hercules and Hemings: African American Cooks in the President’s Kitchen
    – King’s Candy: A New Orleans Kitche
    n Vision
    – Georgia Gilmore and the Club from Nowhere: A Secret Civil Righ
    ts Kitchen
  • <>1619 Episode 5: The Land of Our Fathers, Part 1 & Part 2
  • <>Chef’s Table – 6x01: Mashama Bailey (on Netflix)
  • <>further reading lists

  • The Ultimate List of Black Owned Farms & Food Gardens
  • A Reading List For Learning About Anti-Black Racism and Food
  • A Black History Month Reading List Centered Around Food and Farming
  • 47 Food Studies Books, Not Just for Black History Month
  • A Food Justice Reading List
  • anyone got sources on prison abolition that i can read? i wanna get way more educated on the subject

  • Our Enemies in Blue
  • The Struggle Within: Prisons, Political Prisoners, and Mass Movements in the United States 
  • Policing the Planet
  • As Black as Resistance
  • Beyond Survival, The Revolution Starts at Home, Arrested Justice for abolitionist responses to gender-based violence 
  • Queer Injustice
  • Against Equality- prisons will not protect you 
  • Angela Davis’s Are Prisons Obsolete and The Meaning of Freedom
  • Captive Genders
  • Abolition Now- the anthology
  • Abolishing Carceral Society
  • Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color
  • The Condemnation of Blackness
  • The Color of Violence by the INCITE collective 
  • All Our Trials: Prisons, Policing, and the Feminist Fight to End Violence
  • One of the most important things I learned in my Language and the Law class is that law enforcement will intentionally misinterpret every type of statement asking for a lawyer as not asking for a lawyer. Even directly saying it like this “I will not speak to you without a lawyer” can be taken as a simple statement of fact rather than a request for a lawyer. You literally have to state “I am now invoking my right to a lawyer” and every time they try to proceed with an interrogation you have to answer every question with “I am invoking my right to have a lawyer present”. You can’t just tell them you won’t talk without a lawyer or that you want a lawyer. You have to state that you are invoking your rights. Otherwise they could just say “well they just said they wouldn’t speak without a lawyer present. That’s not invoking their rights to a lawyer. It’s just stating a fact.” even just stating your right to a lawyer doesn’t count!

    <>PLEASE share this addition. I am a lawyer who works in criminal defense, and this is one of the most avoidable things that people consistently get wrong about the Miranda rights.

    Here are some more “ambiguous” phrases which courts have fo<>und DO NOT invoke your right to a lawyer:

    “Maybe I should speak to my lawyer first.”

    “I might like a lawyer.”

    “I think I should have a lawyer present for this.”

    “Could I speak to my lawyer first?”

    “How long until my lawyer gets here?”

    And perhaps most egregiously – “Get me a lawyer, dawg – ‘cause this is not what’s up.”

    <>Here are the magic phrases which you need to know if you want to invoke your Miranda rights:

    <>1) “Am I free to leave?”

    It’s worth asking this even if the answer is obvious. Even if the officer does not let you leave, by forcing them to admit that you are not free to leave, you are creating a record which your attorney can use to prove that you were in custody. Miranda rights only apply if the interrogation is custodial, meaning that police officers will frequently claim that their suspects were “not in custody” to get around their Miranda rights.

    <>2) “I am invoking my right to remain silent.”

    Simply staying silent <>will not<> invoke your right to remain silent. As absurd as this is, you must explicitly say that you are invoking your right to remain silent in order to invoke that right.

    <>3) “I am invoking my right to an attorney.”

    As stated above, you must be not only clear and unambiguous, but clear and <>legally<> unambiguous. Don’t get cute. Don’t get sassy. And on the flip side, don’t get intimidated and use verbal ticks to minimize your request. Say the line with those words exactly – say it clearly, and say it once, <>and then say noth<>ing else.

    Because even after you’ve done all this, the police can still try to get you to talk. They’re not supposed to interrogate you, but they’re allowed to make casual conversation, and if that conversation just happens to circle back around to the thing they wanted to question you about, well, that’s really your fault for talking after you said you wouldn’t, isn’t it? Can’t possibly fault the poor officers when you initiated if you really wanted to have your rights respected, you wouldn’t have talked to them in the first place.

    The police know this, and they will mercilessly exploit this loophole. So, once you’ve successfully invoked your Miranda rights, any and all conversation you have with police officers will put those rights back into jeopardy. 

    <>Putting it all together:

    Ask: <>“Am I free to leave?”

    If they say no, say:<>“I am invoking my right to remain silent and I am invoking my right to an attorney.”

    And then shut up and <>do not say a single thing to them for any reason whatsoever until you have actually spoken to an attorney. Yes, even if it takes hours. Yes, even if they start talking to you about something else.

    <>Finally, a very important disclaimer:

    I may be a lawyer, but I’m not your lawyer, and I cannot guarantee that what I’ve just laid out here will always work for every situation. We didn’t get to this bizarre and absurd place overnight – we built this ridiculous system piecemeal, by deciding on a case-by-case basis that certain phrases were “too ambiguous” or certain types of questioning weren’t actually questioning at all. The law is still in flux, and is still fundamentally out to get you, and willing to bend plain meaning beyond all recognit<>ion to do it. Even if you invoke your rights perfectly, exactly as I have specified above, there’s a chance that your invocation of rights will be disqualified on some new technicality that no one’s even thought of yet – and that’s precisely the problem.

    Watch this video: “Don’t Talk To The Police”

    Internet Piracy 101

    because everything should be free anyway, so until it is, just steal what you want.

    Torrent Client

    torrenting is a way to share files from one computer to another without the need for a centralized server to hold everything. to start torrenting you need to get a torrent client. there are several different options for all operating systems but my favorite one that is compatible with Linux, OS X and Windows is called Transmission. you can download it from here: https://transmissionbt.com/

    Torrent Tracker

    now that you have the application you need to download stuff, let’s find something to download. trackers come in two varieties: public and private. private trackers are beyond the scope of this post, but the main advantage to them is security. it’s much harder for your ISP to tell what you’re downloading, so you’re much less likely to get sent a copyright claim email if that’s something your ISP does (more on that later). they also typically have higher quality and more obscure content, and usually enforce seeding ratios so that files are always available. by their nature, private trackers are very strict about who they allow access to. there are more extensive guides online for how to gain access if you’re interested. i’m going to focus on public trackers for this post. these don’t require user registration but are susceptible to snooping by some ISPs and their contractors, which i will detail how to get around later in a couple paragraphs.

    there are many trackers out there. my favorite public tracker right now is called 1337x and can be accessed at 1337x.to. one thing to keep in mind about trackers is that due to their legal-grey-area nature they often resort to sketchy shit to stay afloat, such as displaying ads for malware and scams, and dark patterns such as fake “Download” buttons which dont actually lead where you want. a good way to avoid those things is to install an adblocker like ublock origin. 

    using a tracker site is pretty self explanatory: search for what you want and hit download. if you have a torrent client installed, it should automatically come up and ask you to confirm the download. then you just wait until the download finishes, at which point you can open it. tada!

    each torrent on a tracker has a certain number of seeds and peers. these numbers indicate how many other people have copies of the files, and consequently determine how fast your download can finish. try to pick torrents with the higher number of seeds when you can.

    keeping the files in the same directory that your torrent client downloaded them to allows you to act as a seed. this means that when someone else wants the torrent, their torrent client will download some parts of the files directly from your computer. this is the basis for all peer-to-peer sharing and it’s encouraged to seed as much as you can, so that everyone can have consistent access.

    Evading Your ISP

    some ISPs in the US, such as Comcast, have automated systems in place that detect copyrighted material in torrent traffic. when they detect it, you get sent an automatic email that lets you know that they know what you’re doing and you’d better stop right now. in practice, legal action against torrenting is on shaky legal ground, since you can’t actually prove that just because something was downloaded from your connection, it was actually you who did it - after all, it could be a random person who broke into your wifi, or a guest, whatever. these kinds of emails are still scary, however, and i dont trust the courts to protect people forever, so i prefer to go the extra mile by paying for a VPN in those situations. i use mullvad which is $5 per month. again though, not all will ISPs require this; if you’re on a provider who doesn’t care, you don’t have to bother. 

    Torrent To A File Server

    you can torrent stuff directly to your computer but i like to keep all my torrented media on a file server on a network share, because then your files are accessible from any computer on your home network, and they’ll still be there if your computer breaks. there are many software projects that exist to facilitate this; i tend to just build these systems myself but i really like what FreedomBox is going for, so if you have a spare computer and time, i encourage you to play around with that.

    Soft skills for the apocalypse

    Let’s face it, if the world ends, so many of us will flee somewhere else for safety that we’ll end right back up in communities again. There’s going to be more to it than growing your own food and knitting handspun socks.

    I’m linking to resources, but a many of these skills, being interpersonal, are best taught in live trainings by professional instructors, where you can see and feel all the interpersonal dynamics going on in the room, and by experience, trying them out on real people in an educational setting.

    When the world ends, it will be helpful to be able to::

  • Run a meeting
  • Peacefully negotiate
  • De-escalate a potentially violent situation
  • Organize a community
  • Cope when you’re having a panic attack
  • Co-regulate to help a child keep calm
  • Identify community resources
  • Protest safely and peacefully
  • Even small local pieces of activism today, like organizing a protest march or lobbying your municipal government to make public spaces more accessible, have a double reward: There’s the work you’re doing, and the skills you learn when you do it.

    the assumption that people with violent killing skills should be given priority/power in a post-apocalyptic society is the reason it stays post-apocalyptic and doesn’t actually rebuild society

    the assumption that people with violent killing skills should be given priority/power in a post-apocalyptic society is the reason it stays post-apocalyptic and doesn’t actually rebuild society

    Mental Health Must Reads

    As promised, here’s a list of mental health must reads that I’ve  personally read and recommend. I read or listened to all of these books for FREE with my public library card and Libby App but linked to where you can buy these books from the aut<>hors.

    <>Abusive / Narcissistic Parents:

  • Children of the Aging Self Absorbed - Nina Brown - for adult children of narcissistic or abusive parents. Teaches practical yet powerful strategies for navigating the intense negative feelings that these parents can incite, as well as tips to protect yourself.
  • Children of the Self-Absorbed - Nina Brown - Similar to above.
  • Complex PTSD - Pete Walker - The author has CPTSD and wrote this book from the perspective of someone who has experienced a great reduction of symptoms over the years.
  • The Drama of the Gifted Child - Alice Miller - explores the serious if not dangerous consequences parental cruelty can bring to bear on children everywhere. One of the central works by Alice Miller, the celebrated Swiss psychoanalyst.
  • For Your Own Good - Alice Miller - A challenge to the child-rearing practices of punishment and coercion.
  • Toxic Parents - Susan Forward - drawn on case histories and the real-life voices of adult children of toxic parents to help you free yourself from the frustrating patterns of your relationship with your parents.
  • Trapped in the Mirror - Elan Golomb - Adult children of narcissists and their struggle for self.
  • <>Addiction (haven’t read a lot on thi<>s):

  • In The Realm of Hungry Ghosts - Gabor Mat - Close encounters with addiction.
  • <>Anxiety & Stress:

  • Burnout - Emily Nagoski - explains why women experience burnout differently than men and provides a simple, science-based plan to help women minimize stress, manage emotions, and live a more joyful life.
  • When the Body Says No - Gabor Mat - Understanding the stress-disease connection.
  • Doing Harm - Maya Dusenbery - How bad medicine and lazy science leave women dismissed, misdiagnosed, and sick.
  • Rage Becomes Her - Soraya Chemaly - The power of women’s anger.
  • The Tao of Fully Feeling - Pete Walker - Harvesting forgiveness out of blame.
  • The Gift Of Fear - Gavin de Becker - Survival signals that protect us from violence.
  • Emotional Intelligence - Daniel Goleman - insight into our “two minds”—the rational and the emotional.
  • <>Body Image & Disordered Eating:

  • The Body Is Not an Apology - Sonya Renee-Taylor - the power of radical self love.
  • Body Positive Power - Megan Crabbe - Memoir - Because Life Is Already Happening and You Don’t Need Flat Abs to Live It.
  • Dietland - Sarai Walker - Fiction
  • The Fuck It Diet - Caroline Dooner - Eating Should Be Easy
  • Health at Every Size - Linda Bacon - Fat isn’t the problem. Dieting is the problem.
  • Heavy - Kiese Laymon - Memoir
  • Hunger - Roxane Gay - “A Memoir Of (My) Body”
  • Intuitive Eating - Evelyn Tribole - The go-to book on rebuilding a healthy body image and making peace with food.
  • You Are Why You Eat - Dr. Ramani Durvasula - Change Your Food Attitude, Change Your Life
  • <>BPD:

  • The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath - Fiction/Memoir
  • Girl, Interrupted - Susanna Kaysen - Memoir
  • I Hate You - Don’t Leave Me - Jerold Kreisman - Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder
  • The Survivors - Adam Frankel - A Story of War, Inheritance, and Healing
  • <>OCD:

  • Body Punishment - Maggie Simone - OCD, Addiction, & Finding the Courge to Heal
  • Brain Lock - Jeffrey Schwartz - Free Yourself from Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior
  • Overcoming Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts - Sally Winston - A CBT-Based Guide to Getting Over Frightening, Obsessive, or Disturbing Thoughts
  • Radical Acceptance - Tara Brach - Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha
  • <>Sexual Assault / Abuse / Trauma:

  • Asking for It - Kate Harding - The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture-and What We Can Do about It
  • The Body Keeps The Score - Bessel van der Kolk - Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma
  • Come As You Are - Emily Nagoski - An essential exploration of why and how women’s sexuality works.
  • The Courage to Heal - Ellen Bass - A Guide for Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse.
  • Does She Call It Rape? - Lori Girshick - Woman on Woman Sexual Abuse
  • Know My Name - Chanel Miller - Memoir of an Emily Doe
  • Not That Bad - Roxane Gay - Essays of Dispatches from Rape Culture
  • Three Women - Lisa Taddeo - Memoir / Fiction
  • Why Does He Do That? - Lundy Bancroft - Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men
  • <>Workbooks:

  • The Artist’s Way Workbook - Julia Cameron
  • The CBT Workbook
  • The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism
  • Come As You Are - Workbook
  • The Courage to Heal Workbook
  • The DBT Skills Workbook
  • The Intuitive Eating Workbook
  • The Self Love Workbook