@cassowarygirl
Not Even a Penny

Pro-life, Christian, Anti-Communism, Anti-Socialism, Multifandom, Lots of feels, Like no original content, and secretly a Cassowary

Posts
6832
Last update
2021-07-26 14:43:05
    prolifeproliberty

    Public schools are not teaching Critical Race Theory.

    They are applying critical theory in their teaching practices.

    It is critical that we use clear language when we call this out. When we say “they’re teaching Critical Race Theory,” we give marxists the room to redefine what that means and kick the legs out from under our arguments.

    Critical theory includes critical race theory and critical gender theory, along with several other Marxist ideas. If we narrow it down to just critical race theory, we miss other aspects of the indoctrination.

    Teachers are being taught elements of critical race theory (such as implicit bias and internalized racism/misogyny/homophobia/etc.) and then they are encouraged to apply it in their classrooms.

    I know, because as a teacher I’ve sat through these trainings. And I’m in Texas in what used to be considered a fairly conservative district, so don’t think your school is immune.

    We have been offered professional development credit (of which we need a certain number of hours to maintain certification) to read White Fragility, watch leftist/woke documentaries, and listen to speakers advocate for giving preference to black people over other minorities.

    In 2020, these sorts of sessions were the only summer professional development opportunities my district offered. Nothing on virtual teaching or meeting the needs of students who were falling behind due to missed instruction in the spring.

    I’ve also sat through required sessions where I was told that as a white person I am inherently racist, and that denying my racism only made me more racist.

    I was shown pictures of people of different races and genders in different situations and asked to come up with the harmful stereotypes others might say about them.

    But worst of all, I sat through sessions where we looked at student data (test scores, disciplinary data, etc) filtered through the lens of race.

    We were expected to see race as the cause for any and all discrepancies in the data.

    I remember specifically with one set of data, I believe about disciplinary actions, I was asked for my thoughts. I asked if we could get the same data filtered by academic achievement and socio-economic status.

    My theory was that the discrepancies could be better explained by students growing up in households where both parents worked long hours, didn’t have time to help kids with homework or check in on their academic progress, and would struggle to enforce behavior expectations. I had been in plenty of parent-teacher conferences where this was the parent’s explanation for why the student was acting up in class and falling behind.

    I reasoned that kids who didn’t have the support at home and were behind academically would get frustrated more easily and would be more likely to misbehave, resulting in disciplinary actions.

    The facilitators did not have this data handy (despite it being fairly easy to look up because of how our student data systems work) and said they would try to get me that data later.

    They never did.

    They were entirely unprepared to look at these issues through any lens other than race.

    What is the impact of this? Without explicitly telling us to do so, the expectation is that we make efforts to close the gaps between students of different races in areas like grades and discipline.

    If teachers have this expectation in mind, they may choose to excuse assignments, grade easier, or look the other way in matters of discipline if the student is in a minority category. And guess what - other students WILL notice this.

    More importantly, the students who are being passed along in order to keep the data “equitable” are not having their needs met, and will make it all the way through school without anyone taking the time to make sure they actually learn what they need to learn.

    I am seeing this happen in my school and in other schools where I’ve worked.

    So do not believe marxists when they tell you that Critical Race Theory is just “teaching about racism”

    It is, in fact, “teaching racism” - that is, teaching students and teachers to see each other and every single issue through the lens of race, and to make generalizations and assumptions about each other based on race.

    Make sure you understand what critical theory teaches and how it is being applied (not taught) in schools both public and private.

    And please, if you can, homeschool your kids.

    prolifeproliberty

    Reblogging this because apparently CRT apologists found the article I shared a little bit ago and are trying to tell me that what I’m seeing on my campus isn’t happening.

    tlaquetzqui

    When they say it’s not Marxist I like to say “I assure you, it is, and if you are going to argue that with me I first need you to tell me, in your own words, what Leninism’s major deviation is, from the original form of Marxist theory.”

    Because before you can say whether something is or is not Marxist, you have to know something about Marxism.

    rosecorcoranwrites

    An example of how stupid looking at things only through race is:

    My sister works in a district that got slapped with a lawsuit about race about 40 years ago, so they are hyper conscious about being perceived as racist. Someone in the district was trying to say how horrible it was that at my sister's school, 60% of kids sent to detention were Hispanic.

    That does sound bad, right? 60%? Until you find out that 80% of the school is Hispanic. Any statistic needs to be interpreted, and it needs to be interpreted in light of ALL relevant data.

    prolifeproliberty

    ^ This.

    They give you bits and pieces of data filtered through whatever lens they want to use (gender, race, sexuality, etc) and then refuse to consider any other perspective on what the real problem might be.

    If they say 60% of failing students are black, for instance, you are led to assume that either A) the teachers are racist and grading black students more harshly, B) black students face some kind of challenge that white students don’t, or C) black students are less capable.

    Most people who push critical theory would choose some combination of A and B. I don’t know anyone who would actually choose C. So some people who don’t believe in critical theory think they have to choose A or B, even if it doesn’t sound quite right.

    Here’s the problem: if you answer either A or B, you haven’t explained the other 40% of the failing students. You need more data.

    It could be that the demographic breakdown of failing students aligns with the demographics of the school.

    Or it could be that those failing students have something else in common. Some of them may be students with disabilities who are being underserved. You may have students with undiagnosed disabilities who aren’t getting any services at all. You might have single parent households where the parent is trying to just put food on the table and can’t also keep up with their kids’ education - so you may need tutoring or other support services. You also may have cultural differences where some families have different priorities and don’t emphasize academics.

    If you only filter by race, you have to respond with a race-based solution. Which quickly turns into racism (and before you come at me with the nonsense about needing institutional power, the education system is an institution).

    If you look at all the data, you might actually be able to help those kids.

    one-time-i-dreamt

    I’ve changee my Instagram username after like 9 years of having it, I feel weirdly emotional

    an-absolute-travesty

    I’m sorry but your profile picture looks like a female version of Boyinaband

    one-time-i-dreamt

    I’ve been told that I look like him before

    imnotsureanymore

    Well, I didn’t know him so I googled and-

    one-time-i-dreamt

    I also kind of think he looks like @setheverman but with colorful hair

    valtharr

    are you saying Dave is actually the fusion of you and Seth Everman

    one-time-i-dreamt

    I’m saying Infinity War is not the most ambitious crossover anymore

    delightfullyshamelessdinosaur

    Im gonna do something cursed

    delightfullyshamelessdinosaur

    God forgive me for i have sinned

    one-time-i-dreamt

    ERZHHGGGJJGRUKVFUBZKZXUVUVIFUFZFUCFZDTDZFUGIGIDUDUFUVKGKHIFUFUFUFIGUFZ

    the-real-peter-parker

    BILLIE EILISH????

    one-time-i-dreamt

    Which one of us???

    the-worm-man

    this is like the end of a scooby doo episode

    archie-is-actually-a-girls-name

    Wait. One-time-I-dreamt had a…face?

    one-time-i-dreamt

    Hey, I still have it!

    dr-whoretex

    Not for long

    queers-angelblades-knifeshoes

    KOH THE FACE STEALER!!!!!???!!

    rembrandttheforbiddenone

    This is just the best interaction on the site

    world-heritage-posts

    world heritage post

    nitholites

    I am, once again, reblogging this wild ride of a post

    radioactiveguitarstrings

    this is like bohemian rhapsody if it was a tumblr post

    prolifeproliberty

    Public schools are not teaching Critical Race Theory.

    They are applying critical theory in their teaching practices.

    It is critical that we use clear language when we call this out. When we say “they’re teaching Critical Race Theory,” we give marxists the room to redefine what that means and kick the legs out from under our arguments.

    Critical theory includes critical race theory and critical gender theory, along with several other Marxist ideas. If we narrow it down to just critical race theory, we miss other aspects of the indoctrination.

    Teachers are being taught elements of critical race theory (such as implicit bias and internalized racism/misogyny/homophobia/etc.) and then they are encouraged to apply it in their classrooms.

    I know, because as a teacher I’ve sat through these trainings. And I’m in Texas in what used to be considered a fairly conservative district, so don’t think your school is immune.

    We have been offered professional development credit (of which we need a certain number of hours to maintain certification) to read White Fragility, watch leftist/woke documentaries, and listen to speakers advocate for giving preference to black people over other minorities.

    In 2020, these sorts of sessions were the only summer professional development opportunities my district offered. Nothing on virtual teaching or meeting the needs of students who were falling behind due to missed instruction in the spring.

    I’ve also sat through required sessions where I was told that as a white person I am inherently racist, and that denying my racism only made me more racist.

    I was shown pictures of people of different races and genders in different situations and asked to come up with the harmful stereotypes others might say about them.

    But worst of all, I sat through sessions where we looked at student data (test scores, disciplinary data, etc) filtered through the lens of race.

    We were expected to see race as the cause for any and all discrepancies in the data.

    I remember specifically with one set of data, I believe about disciplinary actions, I was asked for my thoughts. I asked if we could get the same data filtered by academic achievement and socio-economic status.

    My theory was that the discrepancies could be better explained by students growing up in households where both parents worked long hours, didn’t have time to help kids with homework or check in on their academic progress, and would struggle to enforce behavior expectations. I had been in plenty of parent-teacher conferences where this was the parent’s explanation for why the student was acting up in class and falling behind.

    I reasoned that kids who didn’t have the support at home and were behind academically would get frustrated more easily and would be more likely to misbehave, resulting in disciplinary actions.

    The facilitators did not have this data handy (despite it being fairly easy to look up because of how our student data systems work) and said they would try to get me that data later.

    They never did.

    They were entirely unprepared to look at these issues through any lens other than race.

    What is the impact of this? Without explicitly telling us to do so, the expectation is that we make efforts to close the gaps between students of different races in areas like grades and discipline.

    If teachers have this expectation in mind, they may choose to excuse assignments, grade easier, or look the other way in matters of discipline if the student is in a minority category. And guess what - other students WILL notice this.

    More importantly, the students who are being passed along in order to keep the data “equitable” are not having their needs met, and will make it all the way through school without anyone taking the time to make sure they actually learn what they need to learn.

    I am seeing this happen in my school and in other schools where I’ve worked.

    So do not believe marxists when they tell you that Critical Race Theory is just “teaching about racism”

    It is, in fact, “teaching racism” - that is, teaching students and teachers to see each other and every single issue through the lens of race, and to make generalizations and assumptions about each other based on race.

    Make sure you understand what critical theory teaches and how it is being applied (not taught) in schools both public and private.

    And please, if you can, homeschool your kids.

    prolifeproliberty

    Reblogging this because apparently CRT apologists found the article I shared a little bit ago and are trying to tell me that what I’m seeing on my campus isn’t happening.

    Reminder that the application of critical theory principles in education didn’t start in 2020. Parents just found out about it when they started paying attention to what their kids were learning.

    This has infected our school system for so long that rooting it out isn’t as simple as a “CRT ban.” Parents have to take their kids out of these schools before they can start undoing the damage already done to their kids.

    Time to #Unenroll

    satanpositive

    Roses are red, that much is true, but violets are purple, not fucking blue.

    feels-for-the-fictional

    I have been waiting for this post all my life.

    marzipanandminutiae

    They are indeed purple, But one thing you’ve missed: The concept of “purple” Didn’t always exist.

    Some cultures lack names For a color, you see. Hence good old Homer And his “wine-dark sea.”

    A usage so quaint, A phrasing so old, For verses of romance Is sheer fucking gold.

    So roses are red. Violets once were called blue. I’m hugely pedantic But what else is new?

    ineptshieldmaid

    My friend you’re not wrong About Homer’s wine-ey sea! Colours are a matter Of cultural contingency;

    Words are in flux And meanings they drift But the word purple You’ve given short shrift.

    The concept of purple, My friends, is old And refers to a pigment once precious as gold.

    By crushing up molluscs From the wine-dark sea You make a dye: Imperial decree

    Meant that in Rome,
    to wear purpura
    was a privilege reserved

    For only the emperor!

    The word ‘purple’, for clothes so fancy, Entered English By the ninth century

    .

    Why then are voilets Not purple in song? The dye from this mollusc, known for so long

    Is almost magenta; More red than blue. The concept of purple is old, and yet new.

    The dye is red, So this might be true: Roses are purple And violets are blue

    .

    squeeful

    While this song makes me merry, Tyrian purple dyes many a hue From magenta to berry And a true purple too.

    But fun as it is to watch this poetic race The answer is staring you right in the face: Roses are red and violets are blue Because nothing fucking rhymes with purple.

    young-il-long-kiyoshi

    IT GOT SO MUCH BETTER.

    farrentalon

    My reaction, only with coffee.

    thetiredpianist

    Hang on, need to send this to my literature prof

    gravelgirty

    Purple is prose and as we all know

    English is not a tongue neat.

    Words are alive, and flexible, they jibe

    And from our sick brains they meet:

    Rhyming with purple to the lexicon burgle,

    And remember there’s more than just herbal

    We can color–empurple,

    (Alternatively impurple )

    And we can also enrage! Bepurple!

    You can’t ride a horse without a good curple

    Or you’ll fall and then walk with a hirple.

    Don’t forget plurals, for varied are purples,

    and besprinkle–that’s called disperple.

    Even rarer are names

    Although that seems strange,

    Recall Burkel, Myrtle, and Urkel!

    Watch out for the gods

    Like Akkadian Nergal

    You don’t want your blood to go curdle!

    A husky is curtal,

    And if unspayed is fertile,

    But never as much as a gerbil.

    With clothes we have kirtle

    And don’t forget girdle

    Or how babies will gurgle

    I think we could keep going in circles.

    gravelgirty

    Reposting this because a buddy was looking for ‘purple’ words this week.

    Black-Clad Bats and Making Money

    From a post by @feynites: “I’d like to see John Mulaney play a live action Riddler. But not, like, as any character other than John Mulaney? Just this socially awkward disaster man who somehow becomes a supervillain because of a misunderstanding he couldn’t correct without ‘seeming rude’.”

    You may recognise me as the man who programmed — because that’s what being a game programmer gets you, instant celebrity, like Shigeru Miyamoto and the guy who invented Tetris — you may recognise me as Edward Nigma, the man who programmed Labyrinth of the Minotaur, a bestselling game whose apparent claim to fame is that it is unwinnable. I’m not quite sure why that was the selling point. See, the thing about puzzle games is that you’re supposed to solve them. That’s the way theyre designed. So every time someone praised Labyrinth of the Minotaur, it would be like, “Hey, did you hear about this game I’m too dumb to solve? It’s my favourite puzzle game! You should see if you’re too dumb to solve it, too!” And all their idiot friends would be like, “Yeah! I love being too dumb to solve this game! And that’s how I realised just how easy con artists must have it.

    “But if your game was so successful,” I can hear you wondering, “then what are you doing talking about it here?” And I admit, this is rather a step down from my customary lifestyle of sleeping on a bed of rose petals and cocaine. That’s because programmers, despite our justified mockery of end users who click through the terms and conditions without reading them, are no more lawyers than the rest of the non-selachian population, so the moment the word “whereupon” enters our pupils it triggers an instinctive defense mechanism in the human occipital lobe that makes us forget how to read.

    As a result, I was happily unaware of the scale of the Labyrinth of the Minotaur’s success until one day I come in to work as usual to find that my office has been emptied out, which — for the record is unusual. I turn to my boss, Daniel Mockridge, and politely inquire, “Daniel, what the hell happened to my office?”

    And he says, “That’s not your office anymore.”

    And I say, “Well, all right. Where’s my new office?”

    And he says, “You don’t have one anymore. You’re fired, Eddie.”

    Read on AO3

    prolifeproliberty

    If you are looking for an OB/Gyn who won’t pressure you to take birth control, will actually listen to your symptoms, will take the time to properly diagnose and treat you, and if you’re pregnant will see both you and your baby as their patients, start with Fertility Care Centers of America.

    These are healthcare providers who use NaProTechnology, take fertility issues (including miscarriage) seriously, and are life-affirming.

    We have a practice in my area that’s on this list, and I know so many women who go to that practice and rave about the doctors and staff there. Even better, the practice is connected to a pregnancy center and provides low-cost care to women referred to them by the center.

    I highly recommend starting with this directory if you’re looking for an OB.

    scarlettrose0

    Why is birth control bad?

    prolifeproliberty

    1. When used as a method of pregnancy prevention, it can in some cases prevent the implantation and thereby cause the death of a newly formed human embryo (a very young human being).

    2. It screws up women’s hormone balance, potentially causing a variety of health problems from weight gain to depression to blood clots to cancer.

    3. It is way overprescribed as a “cure all” by doctors who are unwilling to do the basic level of work in properly diagnosing women’s health issues and identifying appropriate treatments.

    4. Many women do not want to take birth control for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to:

    - A desire to live a less medicated/more natural lifestyle

    - Contraindications such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and migraine

    - Religious beliefs

    - A desire to have children

    For all those reasons and more, women should be able to see a doctor who can give them other options besides birth control pills, especially for health issues that can be treated or even cured with a more targeted approach.

    trumpsdeplorable51
    becausewelivehere

    Stop buying solar.

    noblepeasant

    You can read the study yourself on Scribd here:

    This version is interactive, so you can click on links and footnotes for further evidence

    prolifeproliberty

    We should absolutely go to nuclear thorium molten salt reactors for the bulk of our energy. But if you're intending to put solar panels on your roof to be less dependent on the grid, there are alternatives. The document linked above has a section at the end where it lists a few companies that cannot be confirmed to use slave labor (though the authors can't confirm they don't), but then also mentions a U.S. based company called First Solar that doesn't use the material that comes from Uyghur slave labor because they use a different technology.

    The company also has a statement on its website condemning forced labor and pledging not to use any components that come from forced labor in their panels.

    I am very happy that there is an alternative, but the authors of the study warn that this one company cannot meet global demand. However, it does sound like First Solar is planning to expand.

    Also, it looks like First Solar primarily does large scale applications like solar farms, but it would be worth contacting them to see if they do residential applications, or if it's possible for another company that does residential to buy and use their panels.

    I absolutely want people to be able to get off the grid (or at least be less dependent on it), so until thorium molten salt reactors are commercially available at household scale, we do need solar. Hopefully First Solar is the way to do it without supporting slave labor.

    life-advocate-feminist

    It blows my mind that there’s literally videos of disabled speakers crying and begging for the right to life for disabled fetuses and pro aborts will be like “actually listening to pro life disabled people is not progressive at all”

    the-christian-feminist

    You're right and you should say it @pro-birth-midwife-student

    hislittleflower-throughconcrete

    This also applies to literal abortion survivors who speak out against abortion and pro-abortion peeps try to change the subject instead of looking at what abortion does directly in the face

    i find it hypocritical that the difference between a baby and a clump of cells is whether or not the mother wants her child.

    it's absolutely pathetic to reduce a life to a subhuman category for one pregnancy and then when the baby is actually not an incovenience anymore, suddenly he deserves the rights and protections afforded to humans?

    makes me realize how far humans will go to dehumanize others so that they can feel better about their selfish and corrupt behaviours. didn't they do the same for slavery?

    Bat-Sibling Interaction

    This started as attempt to read every issue of every series where Dick and Tim interacted. It’s kind of spiraled from there, into this thing - an attempt at cataloguing what the Batfamily call each other, and how it’s changed over time.

    Keep reading

    propagandamax

    They told us their plans long ago

    prolifeproliberty

    If you know they’re doing this and you still drop of your kids at a public school, you’re giving them permission to do this to your children. No matter how many PTA meetings you attend or how many angry letters you write.

    Stop giving them your children.

    It’s time to Unenroll.

    galahadwilder

    We all know Bruce dislikes Hal Jordan but what if the reason is because he knows Hal is an orphan and he’s desperately trying to keep his distance lest he adopt this idiot

    galahadwilder

    He narrowly dodged adopting Barry by convincing his brain that, as a fellow forensic scientist, Allen was classified as “colleague” instead of “baby.” It was a very close shave tho

    galahadwilder

    Hal: my dad died in a plane crash when I was 12

    Barry: my dad got falsely arrested for the murder of my mom

    Clark: my entire planet, including my parents, died when I was a baby

    Diana: I never met my father and he likely died during the Roman Republic

    Arthur: my mother died before I got to meet her

    Shiera: I never got to meet my parents, I was raised by Thanagar’s military schools

    Bruce, vibrating with effort: hnnnnnnnng

    galahadwilder

    Bruce: must… not… adopt… Justice League…

    J’onn, fellow Dad™️, while packing Barry his favorite snacks for work: too late we’re committed