@dieborn
Bob Has Bitch Tits

Joe. 21. Ohio. I like: movies, and music, and books. Let's be friends.

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Last update
2020-04-26 03:15:09

    End of the World Cinema

    Located somewhere on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt is this abandoned outdoor cinema.

    It was built by Frenchman Diynn Eadel in the late 1990s, but suffered a power cut on what was supposed to be its premiere night. No one knows what went wrong, but some say the local authorities weren’t thrilled by the prospect of a movie theater in the middle of the desert and were the ones responsible for the generator’s malfunction.

    The first movie it was supposed to screen was Jurassic Park, but the cinema never got to screen a single movie. The cinema has been closed off to tourist by the Egyptian government.

    You can still see what remains of the cinema on Google Maps.

    I’m really fascinated/haunted by this notion that a rural town could pop out of existence and it would probably take weeks for anyone to notice, and in the end the first people to show up might be from a utility coming to shut off power for unpaid bills. Do you think society at large would recognize that everyone from a town of 100 people vanished, or would a network of individuals with no other connections simply think that their one friend or relation wasn’t returning calls? Would motorists passing through Kettleman City on the 5 notice that it wasn’t there? Or would they assume that they missed the signs for the exit and ride right through to Coalinga? Could a big town disappear? How long would it take for people to notice Fresno was missing? Bakersfield? If all flights into Las Vegas got cancelled, if the highway exits disappeared, would people assume it never existed? Would it fade from public memory? Would people choose to forget it? Would people silently accept that their friends and loved ones who lived there were never coming home?

    Project MK Ultra

    From 1953-1973 the CIA conducted hundreds of clandestine experiments—sometimes on unwitting U.S. citizens—to assess the potential use of LSD and other drugs for mind control, information gathering and psychological torture. This top secret project was called MK Ultra.

    The project began during the Cold War era when CIA director Allan Dulles approved it. It was in response to the fear that the Soviets, Chinese, and North Koreans were using mind control on American POWs. The operation aimed to develop techniques that could be used against Soviet bloc enemies to control human behavior with drugs and other psychological manipulators.

    The program involved more than 150 human experiments involving psychedelic drugs, paralytics and electroshock therapy. Sometimes the test subjects knew they were participating in a study, but at other times, they had no idea, even when the hallucinogens started taking effect. 

    Ken Kesey (author of One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest), Ted Kaczynski (aka the Unabomber), and James Joseph “Whitey” Bulger (Boston mobster) were some of more notable participants of the program.

    Most “testing” was conducted in universities, hospitals, or prisons. The record keeping was very poor and most documents pertaining to the program was destroyed when it ended in 1973.