@esquirempire
EsquirempirE

Boobie. Esquire. Celo.

Yearbook Club President. Designer . Gentleman. Artist. Hooper. Pizza Lover. Chicagoan. Insomniac Dreamer. Well-Rounded Square. Where the Truth Lies.

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1907
Last update
2016-07-09 01:13:51
    bonniekristian

    New Yorker Tyeesha Mobley was at a gas station near her Bronx apartment with her two sons when she caught the older boy, aged nine, stealing $10 out of her purse. Thinking this was a good opportunity to teach him a lesson about honesty and consequences, she called the police, asking them to help her communicate the seriousness of stealing.

    When the police arrived, however, Mobley’s Arrested Development-style lesson quickly escalated into a terrifying situation. Three of the four officers who arrived at the gas station apparently understood that this was a lighthearted call. 

    “They started asking Tyleke what did he take,” said Mobley. “He told them. And about three officers was joking around with him, telling him, ‘You can’t be stealing, you’ll wind up going in the police car.’”

    The fourth cop, however, had different ideas. He began yelling: “You black b——es don’t know how to take care of your kids … why are you wasting our time, we aren’t here to raise your kid … why don’t you take your f—-ing kid and leave?”

    When she tried to follow his order, Mobley says the fourth officer arrested her, refusing to give a reason. While she and her children cried for him to stop, one of the other officers attempted to intervene, saying, “We are not supposed to act like this.”

    He replied, “Black b——es like that … this is how I treat them.”

    After her arrest, Mobley was hospitalized for the bruises she’d sustained on her legs thanks to the fourth cop kicking her during the arrest. She successfully fought off child endangerment charges—a pretty interesting charge given that the “endangerment” in question seems to have been calling the police.

    Mobley’s two children were placed in foster care for four months, where they reportedly received sub-par care. Now, having recovered her children—who have undoubtedly learned a very different lesson than the one she intended to teach—Mobley is suing the NYPD.

    And, to paraphrase J. Walter Weatherman,thats why you don’t call the police.

    ohhotdamn-whatahomo

    Fucking god, when will this end?!?!

    beintheloop

    Sharaya J By PATRICIA FIELD

    Photography Mikael Jansson

    SHARAYA FOR THE FUTURE

    A native hawaiian, but raised in Jersey City, New Jersey Sharaya has always been an artist at heart. Music has always been prevalent in her life, exposed early by her father who was a member of 90’s Hip Hop group Double XX Posse she’s always been a natural performer. Looking up to superstars like TLC, AAliyah, Biggie, Wutang Clan, Mary, Janet Jackson and more, she was a true fan of Hip Hop and R&B. With a very successful career in the dance industry working with the likes of Diddy, Rhianna, Alicia Keys as well as great choreographers like Laurianne Gibson, Fatima Robinson and Jamaica Craft; Sharaya is no stranger to the spotlight. Now is her time to take center stage as Missy “Misdameanor” Elliott’s new recording artist. She has a fresh new sound and style, inspired by true Hip Hop and underground dance music. She has also spearheaded The “Banji Movement” which encourages the masses to embrace Uniqueness and Originality, thus birthing the acronym Be Authentic Never Jeopardize Individuality (BANJI). Considering her background and love for dance Sharaya says, ” I just wanna make fun music, Dance is my root so my goal is to get the people dancin again!!!”

    Fashion + #BeInTheLoop by Raygon Fields for EVO-IFC

    IG: raygonomics