if-i-am-not-for-me

    The Wikipedia page linked to literally says his mother is Jewish, which makes Daniel Jewish by literally any definition. Fuck you.

    chibi-blastoise

    By that logic my mother is Christian because so was my grandmother; which means I too am Christian.

    Religion isn’t genetic you know.

    if-i-am-not-for-me

    Judaism is an ethnoreligion, so, actually, in this case it is. Fuck off.

    tikkunolamorgtfo

    First of all, exactly what @if-i-am-not-for-me said: The Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group, which means a person can be ethnically Jewish without being religious. 

    Moreover, @chibi-blastoise, being totally ignorant of Jews and Judaism, obviously has no idea that one can actually be a practicing Jew and still be atheist or agnostic, and that there are, in fact, two branches of Judaism (Reconstructionist/Secular Humanist) devoted to practice through an atheist/agnostic lens. Unlike many other religions, Judaism does not require belief in a deity, and even beyond those two aforementioned branches, I even know several agnostic Jews who are Orthodox. 

    It’s likely that @chibi-blastoise is what we’d refer to as a Christian Atheist, somebody who has Christian heritage and actively participates in secular Christianity without acknowledging that it’s still connected to a religious movement, despite not personally observing it that way. For some reason, it never occurs to people like this that atheist Jews can also have secular versions of their own holidays. Instead, they expect atheist Jews to adopt secularised Christianity because they think their heritage can be devoid of religion in a way ours cannot, which is incredibly offensive and hegemonistic.

    Also, just for the record: 

    image

    “I’m an atheist, but I’m very proud of being Jewish.” Not “I’m an atheist, but I’m proud of having Jewish ancestors.” Daniel Radcliffe says he’s proud of being Jewish. Being. Because “atheist Jew” is not an oxymoron, but rather a perfectly common, normal thing in our culture. 

    Daniel Radcliffe is an explicitly self-identified Jewish atheist and anybody who can’t handle that can die mad about it.

    johnkuzlak

    I’m actually confused… There’s a whole part of Judaism that doesn’t believe in god? Do they not believe the Ten Commandments were a thing or the whole Burning Bush incident? Is Passover a thing for them? It seems like you’d have to believe in a god to believe in such things, but I could be wrong. I am just legit confused how this works.

    tikkunolamorgtfo

    I mean, there are thousands upon thousands of people who celebrate Christmas believing in the Jesus story, so I’m not sure why people would assume atheist Jews can’t celebrate their holidays?

    To answer your question, though, there are two movements in Judaism that don’t put stock in a literal deity. Reconstructinist Judaism, as described by Ellen Umansky, holds that “Judaism does not come from the (mountain) top down, but rather grows from the ground up, as the creation of the Jewish people…the Torah is a sacred document, not because God revealed it, but because it belongs to our people and records our first steps in growing towards the concept of godliness…. God is the name we give to the strivings for ethical insights and coordinate behaviour.”

    Similarly, the Institute for Secular Humanist Judaism believes that “Judaism is the evolving civilization of the Jewish people. It has been created, lived and recreated in response to the needs and beliefs of each generation. In our days, we believe in the power of people to understand their world and to influence it for the better. We celebrate human freedom and responsibility for our choices and actions. And we know that if justice is to exist in our world, we must create it together. Secular Humanistic Judaism is a cultural Jewish identity lived through this human-focused non-theistic philosophy of life.”

    While the movements differ in some ways, basically the idea is that Judaism is our culture and we don’t have to believe in the deity aspects literally for that to have value and meaning to us.

    Philosopher Asher Ginsberg is credited as saying “More than Jews have kept Shabbat, Shabbat has kept the Jews.” Our cultural practices, regardless of how we choose to view them, keep us together as a people.

    I light Shabbat candles. I celebrate all the holidays. Being Jewish is the core of my identity. I don’t have to believe the Torah is literal for those things to be culturally sacred to me.

    unbidden-yidden

    For the xtian atheist goyim who have been bothering me about this lately, this is an excellent explanation.

    That said, even if you still don’t “get it,” that’s fine. What’s not fine is refusing to respect it anyway.

    tobiasdrake

    The more I learn about Judaism, the more I realize how little I actually know about Judaism.

    meirmakesstuff

    The more I learn about Judaism, the more I realize how little I actually know about Judaism.

    If I could choose only one thing about Judaism for everyone in the world to understand, this would be it.

    daggers-drawn

    When we start to talk about morality it becomes so fucking clear this society never escaped an innately christian way of looking at things.

    daggers-drawn

    You really don’t have to overcome your darker nature and be a good person. You don’t have to work for redemption. Guilt is not a virtue, pride is not a sin. You aren’t in need of saving. You’re already worth the life you are living and don’t have to earn it.

    daggers-drawn

    Pleasure and leisure are not shameful. Laziness does not exist. Rest is worth it in and of itself. Plenty without labor should be celebrated. The world does not need to be improved, owned, or controlled by powers secular or ecclesial.

    theocseason4

    Screaming .. what

    abbaskiarostami

    This person thinking a $200-300 bag means you’re the 1%

    repost-this-image

    I'm sitting here boggling at the idea of spending more than $30 on a purse, when i could put that money towards so many other things.

    thats-what-sidhe-said

    $300 is pricey for a bag, but I’ve spent more than that on video games, so it’s hard for me to be judgey about it. They’re good sized bags, with a simple design that you could wear with a ton of stuff and won’t go out of style quickly. If they’re really good quality, they could outlast a number of my cheapo bags, since I go through a few of those a year (when I left the house). You would definitely have to have the money up front, though. (Hello, Boots Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness.) The designer is Liberian-American, though, so you’d be supporting a Black-owned business.

    But I haven’t seen any mention of this brand before, memes or no, so why has this suddenly shown up on Tumblr? Especially since it’s pretty low priced compared to a lot of designer names. Let me google! 

    Ah. AOC bought a somewhat pricey, but practical, designer name bag, supporting a Black immigrant both directly and by providing publicity for his business. Suddenly, a post appears on Tumblr encouraging socialist and communist-leaning people to hate people carrying this particular designer name bag. 

    She’s up for reelection in two months.

    This is what propaganda looks like.

    dandymeowth

    lmfao this is what we mean when we say psyops shit is real y'all

    f1rstperson

    Glad to see my lifelong disinterest in golf is paying off

    princeloki

    let me tell you about golf

    i grew up in a little desert valley called Tucson, Arizona, where it only rains 2 inches a year on average. the majority of the city’s water is pumped from an underground aquifer, which took millions of years to fill. one of the biggest conservation efforts in our city was for water, naturally, and i spent a lot of time learning about low flow toilets and 5 minute showers. i learned that filling your sink basin and washing your dishes in that water is less costly than running the tap. i learned that it only takes 2 days without water on the desert for someone to die

    the city was sinking as the aquifer drained. neighborhoods fell into flood zones that didnt exist 10 years ago

    there’s a road called Golf Links in the city and it is lined with golf courses. miles of green grass where grass doesn’t grow, in a valley where it doesn’t rain. why? because the rich white retirees who moved there to stop the aching in their joints decided they should also get to play golf. meanwhile our public schools taught small children like me that taking long showers would kill the world

    let the golf industry burn

    ralfmaximus

    There are 15,500+ golf courses in the United States alone. 

    Each one consumes ~312,000 gallons of water per day.

    That consumption is equivalent to 55+ million humans per day in the United States… roughly 1/6 the entire population.

    We simply cannot sustain this frivolity, especially for something 99% of us will never use.

    zooophagous

    Destroy golf courses and plant wild grasses and butterfly bushes in their place.

    gayboyfriend

    Can we talk about this?!

    thegayastrologist

    HEY remember in WWII when Jewish people were fleeing Germany and the USA put a quota on how many Jewish immigrants they would accept because they were worried there were too many Jewish people coming over to the USA???

    Reminder that the USA has always been fucking garbage to immigrants and basic humanity

    cutewhittaker

    the straights are at it again

    love-geofffree

    Reblog if you are a greedy gay hoarding refracted light all for your greedy gay self

    october-rosehip

    I totally am, but also: I have a story. The time: 1995. The place: a small liberal arts college. We decided to participate in “denim day” which was a widespread event wherein on National Coming Out Day, you would wear denim to indicate SUPPORT FOR the LGBT community. Our support group made posters that were very, very clear about this. Wearing denim did not mean that you were coming out, it meant you supported anyone around you who might.

    I have never seen so many suits and khakis IN MY LIFE. People who accidentally wore jeans went home and changed.

    The community took it as a rebuke. We drew in closer to eachother, and felt unwelcome everywhere we thought we had friends before.

    And I had people later tell me “You know I support you, just… I didn’t want anyone to think I was.” First off, I DON’T know you support me. Not if you refuse to, for one day, change nothing about your life to show it. Second off… why is that such a terrifying thought to you?

    I remember before rainbows were a “gay thing”. They were everywhere. Church walls next to arks. School walls next to sunshine faces. People have VOLUNTARILY abandoned every other use. I have HEARD PEOPLE SAY they just couldn’t use rainbows anymore because people would think of “gay stuff.”

    So I know this is a joke, and a stolen one at that, but you’ve done this to yourselves. If someone is so terrified of being perceived as queer that they will INSTANTLY abandon something they like if it has queer germs on it now or something, then they don’t deserve refracted light.

    Maybe help us change the world into a place where being mistaken for queer would be just a thing to chuckle about and you can have refracted light back.

    aintnosintobefinallyclean

    The LGBTQ+ community didn’t steal the rainbow. The straights abandoned it.

    entirelytookeen

    People are reblogging with “this is just a stolen Demetri Martin joke” as if that somehow invalidates the point so let me add a supporting incident/addendum:

    There’s a largely apocryphal association of violets as a symbol of love between women as “dating back to Sappho.” This is not really true – Sappho did write poems about violets, but apparently the association really gained traction in America with a 1926 Broadway play called The Captive (adapted from the French, by Edouard Bourdet). The story is about a woman trying to deny her same-sex desire and love, marrying a man in the attempt. Spoilers for a nearly century-old play: it ends happily for the lesbians, it’s pretty cool. Unfortunately because of this, the play was shut down after 17 weeks on charges of obscenity.

    Anyway. The heroine’s lover is never actually seen on stage – but in her final, victorious attempt to lead the heroine back to her side, she sends a nosegay of violets. 

    After the premiere, shutdown, and subsequent court hearings, violet sales plummeted. In an act of what can only be described as “intense hetero panic,” people stopped buying violets. Because of a play. A play where there isn’t even any “enacted” same-sex physicality onstage. But The Captive ends with the women happy, and together. And they exchange violets. 

    And that was all it took! Again, there are stories that lesbians and queer women took inspiration and used violets as signals after the play popularized the association – and I don’t doubt it, although I’m pretty sure we can trust that was mainly women who could afford to do so, financially and socially. But again, that’s largely apocryphal. What is on record is the violet farmers and florists going, “yeah, this play has really fucked us.”   

    Obviously queerness is not infectious, but there’s a bone-deep fear of ever being subject to the same treatment queer people receive, even for a second. And the fear of association with such innocuous, even generic symbols like flowers – like rainbows – means those same people somewhat invest in the idea that treatment is deserved. Because gay symbols are not created by a sexual minority exerting their oh-so-massive cultural influence, but by the dominant majority being more terrified of association than outraged by condemnation.  

    Again, as the follow-up tried to explain: it’s not about the symbol. It’s the defensive disassociation, the “I’M NOT GAY THOUGH,” which is exhausting. And telling. 

    Photos from a gay wedding near Philadelphia, PA, taken in 1957. The owner of the drugstore where these images were developed deemed them inappropriate and never returned them to the grooms. ​60 years later, the photos were found, though archivists have been unsuccessful at locating any of the men pictured.

    (You can reach the archives here if you recognize anyone in these photos:https://www.ouronestory.com/1957-gay-wedding)