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    “Every week my parents drive an hour and half away to visit me in Los Angeles. They stock my fridge, clean my house, do my laundry, cook meals for the week and fix anything broken. It’s important to them that I stay on track ever since I overcame a decade-long opiate addiction. I’ve spent the last two years relearning how to live, replacing all the shame I had with love and connection instead. I am so grateful to be alive, and for the love, support and hope they give me.” — Sandy Kim (Koreatown, Los Angeles)

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    “Love is present in my life in so many different ways, it’s hard to fully express with words. Cooking is one of my favorite activities and I can spend hours in the kitchen, but even more so is the act of sharing it with those that I care for. The joy I see in their faces when I present them a home-cooked meal is one that never gets old.” — Jingyu Lin (Brooklyn)

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    “My parents have been married for almost 58 years. They are a quiet couple without many activities, especially during the pandemic. But they still enjoy their daily routines. Many Japanese people, especially of my parents’ generation, do not express their feelings physically, such as with hugging or holding hands. But I wanted to capture the quiet moments in their lives together, to show their way of love, and my way of love to them, through the lens.” — Hiroko Masuike (Osaka, Japan)

    “...  by so intensely throwing ourselves into a love that can never be fully requited, we master the difficult art of unselfish love — a love we can then direct at anyone, free of expectation of return... .“

    Browne puts it simply:

    He that can love his friend with this noble ardor will, in a competent degree, affect all.