VAGUELY BIPEDAL / HARD TO KILL WITH MELEE WEAPONS. MAKING THIS TRAGIC MEAT MACHINE MORE EFFICIENT ONE NUTRIENT SLURRY AT A TIME - I CRAVE THE FLAME

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2020-07-03 19:18:33

    Proposed stylistic convention: if a footnote is just a citation, stick it at the end because nobody cares; if it's your commentary, don't segregate it from the main text, write it right there inline in parentheses.

    with paper books, putting the notes at the bottom of the page is imo the best way to do it.

    online having hovertext or expandable notes or side by side display if the screen is wide enough is good (with the footnotes printed as a block at the end or something).

    gwern.net is a good example of the hovertext in that I’m often interested in inspecting the notes inline but also often not, and printing them all in full at that point would destroy the flow.

    notes at the bottom of the page are good, but often they extend for several footnote-pages, which is quite annoying (because then i have to bookmark while reading)

    my opinion is that long footnotes should take up as much of the page as needed such that you won’t have to flip back when you finish - e.g. if the first sentence on a page has a page long footnote, the ‘foot’ should start on the second line of the page.

    also if you have pages long footnotes god help you

    Who is the target market for minute rice, anyway? Who is like "I want to make rice, if only the process weren't so complicated and time-consuming"?

    almost everyone who eats rice as a staple wants rice but with a less time consuming preparation.

    a common solution is to rice cooker a whole pile of rice and then store it, to be reheated in a microwave.

    you can buy cooked cold rice - both in fancy packaged format and in ‘we have a rice cooker and takeout containers in the back’ format.

    minute rice is maybe like that for people who don’t have microwaves?

    Proposed stylistic convention: if a footnote is just a citation, stick it at the end because nobody cares; if it's your commentary, don't segregate it from the main text, write it right there inline in parentheses.

    with paper books, putting the notes at the bottom of the page is imo the best way to do it.

    online having hovertext or expandable notes or side by side display if the screen is wide enough is good (with the footnotes printed as a block at the end or something).

    gwern.net is a good example of the hovertext in that I’m often interested in inspecting the notes inline but also often not, and printing them all in full at that point would destroy the flow.

    anonymous

    Another reason some men fear women is anxiety over female sexual power. The feminist response to that anxiety seems mixed. Some feminists consider sexual wiles a sexist stereotype that erases women's disadvantage (see: discourse over historical accounts of Cleopatra). Others embrace the idea of sexual wiles as empowering (see: a lot of the appreciation for Hustlers, and Brooke Candy's statement that "women hold so much power in their bodies, it's crazy to have these guys by their fucking nuts").

    [re]

    Oh yeah, that’s true! It wasn’t on my mind because the context was “men are afraid that women will laugh at them” and the way that fear of women informed the desire for non-threatening bimbos, which isn’t about that dimension of it -- that’s more a factor behind a fondness for tradwife types, I think -- but in the context of “men’s fear of women” it’s absolutely a thing, and it’s also important to understanding masculine solidarity subcultures, as far as that goes.

    I brushed on it a little bit in this post, though not in any depth. I haven’t really talked about the feminist angle on it, though I should note that the ability to manipulate men sexually is confined to a pretty small subset of women, who have to do quite a bit of work to stay in that subset, which limits its ability to be an equalizing force.

    I’d argue that it’s also relevant that the ability to manipulate men sexually is limited to a subset of men, also. this is perhaps not so important if you’re trying to achieve transactional gains, but I think it affects the dynamic.

    if you just need to manipulate a guy, or a guy who is a member of some class, you’re probably good to go! but if you want to manipulate a specific guy you’re rolling the dice.

    @weasleyan-university yeah I don't disagree. I forgot to write this but my theory here is that ridicule is much more universal than sexual manipulation, and that it operates on the social world rather than the person itself.

    To oversimplify, you can 'choose' in the moment whether or not to be manipulated by sex, whereas other people choose whether or not you are ridiculed.

    y'all ever feel real moist

    @invertedporcupine​:

    somebody apparently wants to get dogpiled by their women-mutuals

    somebody apparently jogged a couple miles in the afternoon in nyc and was unable to immediately take a shower afterwards

    I’m unsure of why being covered in water is gross when it’s your sweat and good when it came out of a tube in the wall, but that’s life

    anonymous

    Another reason some men fear women is anxiety over female sexual power. The feminist response to that anxiety seems mixed. Some feminists consider sexual wiles a sexist stereotype that erases women's disadvantage (see: discourse over historical accounts of Cleopatra). Others embrace the idea of sexual wiles as empowering (see: a lot of the appreciation for Hustlers, and Brooke Candy's statement that "women hold so much power in their bodies, it's crazy to have these guys by their fucking nuts").

    [re]

    Oh yeah, that’s true! It wasn’t on my mind because the context was “men are afraid that women will laugh at them” and the way that fear of women informed the desire for non-threatening bimbos, which isn’t about that dimension of it -- that’s more a factor behind a fondness for tradwife types, I think -- but in the context of “men’s fear of women” it’s absolutely a thing, and it’s also important to understanding masculine solidarity subcultures, as far as that goes.

    I brushed on it a little bit in this post, though not in any depth. I haven’t really talked about the feminist angle on it, though I should note that the ability to manipulate men sexually is confined to a pretty small subset of women, who have to do quite a bit of work to stay in that subset, which limits its ability to be an equalizing force.

    I’d argue that it’s also relevant that the ability to manipulate men sexually is limited to a subset of men, also. this is perhaps not so important if you’re trying to achieve transactional gains, but I think it affects the dynamic.

    if you just need to manipulate a guy, or a guy who is a member of some class, you’re probably good to go! but if you want to manipulate a specific guy you’re rolling the dice.

    Everyone always says that tumblr staff never fixes any bugs and just keeps making things worse. And this feels true a lot. They definitely keep making the interface fight even harder against reading the site reasonably.

    But they do sometimes fix real problems. So I’d like to take some time to notice that they fixed the weird fucking bug with using keypad codepoints to type unicode characters into the blogging text field, where it used to be that you’d have both the actual numbers and the unicode symbol both print and you’d have to go back and delete the numbers.

    the Tumblr Experience™

    it is fixed! what a joyous day

    so, bank tellers are instructed to, in the case of a robbery, comply with the robber’s requests and hand over the money, trusting that recovery measures will be successful and that the situation will be resolved without the need for a dangerous attempt to intervene.

    but what is, exactly, the cutoff for “in the case of a robbery”? presumably if someone were to walk in and say “please give me all of the money in the safe”, they would say “what? no,” and that’d be that. does the robber need to have a weapon? or is threatening behavior enough to qualify? what exactly is preventing me from walking up, instructing the teller to “hand over the cash”, and exploiting their policy to “rob” the bank without ever technically committing a crime?

    My impression is that a substantial fraction of bank robberies involve no weapon and are conducted by passing the teller a note.

    I'm not sure what the notes typically say, but my guess is that if you claim to be robbing them, that's enough.

    My guess is that the vague gesturing plan would fail in that you would either have to actually be threatening, or explicit about what you wanted, in order to get the money.

    anonymous asked:

    What do you think are the most influential, successful, or popular webcomics? It can be kind of hard to tell, because the internet is really good at segmenting itself, so I would be curious about your opinions.

    Penny Arcade is so obviously the most influential webcomic of all time that I’m going to ignore it in favor of the second most influential webcomic of all time, one that has fewer direct clones than Penny Arcade, but which influenced early webcomics in varied and strange ways. A little 1337sp34k comic called

    Megatokyo was started in the year 2000 by two dudes named Piro and Largo. in the year 2000.

    The year 2000 was a very different time, a limbo time. The 90s had ended with the Dot-Com bubble collapsing and average people starting to realize that computers weren’t literal fucking magic, but the 2000s hadn’t really started yet. Al Gore was running against George W. Bush in an election where everyone thought the two candidates were basically identical and it would be the least important election of all time. After all, it was the End Of History, America was at the height of its power and would stay there forever, wages were rising and that obviously wasn’t going to stop anytime soon, and our long national nightmare of peace and prosperity seemed unceasing, while our culture was united in the belief that torturing people was “bad”. Pokemon was far huger than it is even now, and a generation of kids was unaware of what Digimon Tamers was about to do to their burgeoning sexualities

    This show mostly just got me into Kazaa-ing to get the far superior Japanese OSTs, but other people had….stronger….reactions to Renamon.

    Webcomics of the time were mostly influenced by newspaper comics. Simple are, gag a day, and aimed at the kind of middle-aged tech nerd who’d be an early adopter of the “computer” thingies. Penny Arcade mainly broke the mold by being edgier and aiming at a younger audience, but even they were clearly influenced primarily by newspaper comics first and foremost.

    And in this ecosystem, a dude named Largo wanted to make a gag-a-day comic and roped his artist friend Piro into drawing it for him. Largo wanted to make a traditional newspaper-style comic, but Piro was a massive weeb who wanted to do a vertical comic like Japanese 4Koma strips.

    They decided to split the difference with this 2x2 grid as a compromise. The grid was actually a pretty efficient use of screen real estate on low-resolutions 90s monitors, and a lot of new comics started copying this odd square format. That’s since fallen out of fashion, but one artifact of this arbitrary compromise lives on in internet culture to this very day

    As the comic went on, it became Piro’s comic more and more and Largo’s less and less, eventually leading to a falling out and the first big bit of Webcomic Drama, but for this essay what matters is that Megatokyo got weebier.

    This is not what webcomics looked like in 2001. The art was phenomenal (er, by 2001 standards, at least. It was a different time, before anyone with an art background was making webcomics), and instead of being gag a day newspaper strip, it was a romantic dramedy graphic novel heavily inspired by anime and dating sims. Webcomic creators in 2001 were too old to have grown up with the mid-90s anime boom, but webcomic readers were, and the weebs and squeebs filling America’s high schools in the Bush administration ate this shit up. That’s not a random catgirl hat Piro is wearing up there, it’s specifically the hat worn by Puchiko in Di Gi Charat, a contemporary anime that didn’t air on TV on America and you either bought the DVDs or torrented it (you torrented it). You didn’t get those kind of deep cuts from Penny Arcade, or PvP, or really anywhere on the internet but Megatokyo and anime forums.

    Megatokyo was responsible for bringing anime fans into the gamer-dominated world of webcomics. Would that happened anyway? Perhaps. Probably. But maybe not! Is it possible that, without Megatokyo, webcomics go the way of animutations and machinima and youtube poops, a small part of an internet subculture that never really becomes a “thing” generally, until and unless some 90s kid gets old enough to create a hit comic of their own?  Maybe. I wouldn’t have gotten into webcomics without Megatokyo. A lot of people wouldn’t have. And perhaps, by bringing in a new and different audience, Megatokyo is actually the most influential webcomic of them all?

    But the strangest influence Megatokyo had was Ping. Ping is an accessory for the then-new Playstation 2 who is a robot. Because this is Megatokyo, it’s a robot that looks like a cute anime girl with pigtails, but, regardless. Piro and Largo had a pet robot. And other webcomics liked the idea of robots. They liked this idea a lot.

    Ctrl-Alt-Delete ripped this idea off most blatantly. Megatokyo had a Playstation robot, so CAD had an Xbox Robot

    Applegeeks, a popular-but-not-dead comic had a Macintosh Robot

    And Questionable Content had a PC robot (if you ever wondered why the otherwise realistic world of QC had sentient robots for over a decade before treating it as worth mentioning, that’s why)

    And then, eventually, QC made its robot a cute anime girl with pigtails, and the circle of reference was complete. 

    This has got me trying to figure out what year I started reading webcomics

    CAD is still omnipresent in the background on account of loss. PA is now a series of... Conventions? Or something. I wonder if megatokyo stills updates once a year or something. Maybe it finished!

    gaaaahhh tumblr has switched me to its new mobile style interface and the url of a page no longer helps you go back to the same place, so every time it starts from the beginning again. Who thought this was a good idea, I’m going to use this product substantially less in the future, which seems the opposite of what they’d want

    sounds like the new style will has reduced operating costs! a great success!

    rustingbridges

    agreement on the standard form of the trolley problem is hardly universal

    It’s not universal but the 90% number wasn’t an ass-pull.  That’s what people actually get in surveys.

    hmm higher than I would have expected. I’d bet this is pretty subject to wording but that is kind of one of the points of the trolley problem so so it goes.

    anyway my formative experience with this is that the first time I was explaining the trolley problem to someone who hadn’t heard it before, I pitched the first half and got blindsided by “it depends, but likely not”, after which I had to explain how the second half of the thought experiment had been going to expose a troubling inconsistency in the thinker’s moral reasoning. instead of which I got a mild lecture on moral ambiguity.

    Yeah, 90% is not 100%, and that’s important! But something like 80% of people have the inconsistent pairing.

    But yeah, as you say, phrasing matters a lot here; people react to a lot more than just the raw numbers involved. And that’s kind of the point.

    this is fair,and in that sense the trolley problem is not a bad thought experiment - I think it can be reasonable to give the ‘inconsistent’ pairing, but you ought to be able to explain the difference.

    so, I’ll narrow my complaints - I think the way the trolley problem is often presented is bad. rather than looking for the underlying moral reasoning, it’s often an attempt to shame people for their supposed hypocrisy, and attempts to contextualize the questions are often treated illegitimately, when I’d say the context is the key to making moral choices.

    to go back to the post this commented on, you say:

    that discourse only triggers if you think the trolley problem itself is a legit question that people are arguing about, which they aren’t. The trolley problem, standing alone, is boring and almost everyone agrees.

    for many formulations of the problem, I’m in the group that disagrees! so if I voice my opinion, there’s disagreement over it.

    and in a large enough forum, you an absolutely turn up that minority who disagree. which of course is going to derail the conversation you might have had that was conditioned on everyone agreeing in the first place.

    rustingbridges

    agreement on the standard form of the trolley problem is hardly universal

    It’s not universal but the 90% number wasn’t an ass-pull.  That’s what people actually get in surveys.

    hmm higher than I would have expected. I’d bet this is pretty subject to wording but that is kind of one of the points of the trolley problem so so it goes.

    anyway my formative experience with this is that the first time I was explaining the trolley problem to someone who hadn’t heard it before, I pitched the first half and got blindsided by “it depends, but likely not”, after which I had to explain how the second half of the thought experiment had been going to expose a troubling inconsistency in the thinker’s moral reasoning. instead of which I got a mild lecture on moral ambiguity.

    image

    -_-

    There are exactly as many laws requiring tenants to provide references as there are laws requiring landlords to provide references. What you meant to say is “It’s strange that I’ve decided never to ask landlords for references even though I clearly want them.”

    It’s almost as if there’s a power imbalance between them that allows anyone to easily predict that asking a landlord for references is rarely useful or effective.

    have y’all actually had to give a landlord a reference? I’ve never done that.

    anyway if you want a reference for your landlord, don’t ask them, pick them yourself - you’ll get more accurate information. you know where they live.

    (I have given proof of income, but I always demand proof of the apartment before renting, so that doesn’t seem imbalanced.)

    i actually kind of like wearing a face mask in public. it’s a great way to signal “talking to me will be difficult, please don’t do so unless absolutely necessary” which is something i’ve wanted to signal for years

    you would hope so, and it was working back in march ~ april, but at this point but the canvassers and beggars are back out in force, largely not wearing masks, and absolutely willing to get up in my face

    there are several philosophies of worldbuilding. i think the following taxonomy roughly describes four of them:

    1) systematic, scholarly, steeped in history and linguistics and geography, using real-world examples to carefully reason about how a fictional world would work. mostly used to build a world first, stories set in that world come later

    2) picaresque: just throwing out random stuff as background for the characters in the story you really want to tell to run into. story comes first.

    3) saga: you’re telling a story, but it’s on a grand scale, good vs evil kind of shit. the worldbuilding can be systematic, but sometimes realism is ignored for thematic reasons/narrative/rule of cool. Silmarillion is the ur-example (Tolkien gets an A+ in linguistics, but an F in geography); it all holds together as long as you don’t examine any single part in isolation too closely (i.e., mirkwood should be a GIANT RAIN SHADOW DESERT). feels like the most popular form for fantasy, because it admits both high melodrama and smaller scale adventure, or both at the same time. definitely part of ISO Standard Fantasy

    4) Fundamentally Weird. can be systematic or unsystematic, but most importantly: you know that thing where most worldbuilding, esp. in fantasy, is concerned with having a day-to-day human-scale experience that resembles our own, or at least an imagined, medievalized version of our own? yeah, throw that out. we’re not doing that, or anything in that neighborhood, or even anything vaguely resembling it. we live on the surface of a hypercube now, or the world is inside a giant flower, or math is haunted by ghosts that whisper the future in the ears of babies or something. I feel like Greg Egan is really, really good at this. But another classic example would be The Inverted World (which is very Eganesque–or should we say Egan is Priestesque?)

    I think my preferred style is to inject random weird shit into 2 and 3, and then try to rationalize it via 1, but my favorite kind to read is 4, when it’s well-done.

    also, “worldbuilding wiki” should be a more popular genre of fiction. it’s a way more interesting way to explore a world, esp. if liberally littered with in-universe texts (do they contradict one another? is there historical ambiguity? EVEN BETTER) than having an Excuse Plot you have to fill with random episodes.

    assuming, as one can safely do, that my experience of the world is universal and widespread, I think exploring fictional worlds through wikis is popular, but the novel or game or whatever comes first because that’s what sells you on that particular world being worth the time