ohkhaleesimykhaleesi

    “Dogs don’t know what they look like. Dogs don’t even know what size they are. No doubt it’s our fault, for breeding them into such weird shapes and sizes. My brother’s dachshund, standing tall at eight inches, would attack a Great Dane in the full conviction that she could tear it apart. When a little dog is assaulting its ankles the big dog often stands there looking confused — “Should I eat it? Will it eat me? I am bigger than it, aren’t I?” But then the Great Dane will come and try to sit in your lap and mash you flat, under the impression that it is a Peke-a-poo… Cats know exactly where they begin and end. When they walk slowly out the door that you are holding open for them, and pause, leaving their tail just an inch or two inside the door, they know it. They know you have to keep holding the door open. That is why their tail is there. It is a cat’s way of maintaining a relationship. Housecats know that they are small, and that it matters. When a cat meets a threatening dog and can’t make either a horizontal or a vertical escape, it’ll suddenly triple its size, inflating itself into a sort of weird fur blowfish, and it may work, because the dog gets confused again — “I thought that was a cat. Aren’t I bigger than cats? Will it eat me?” … A lot of us humans are like dogs: we really don’t know what size we are, how we’re shaped, what we look like. The most extreme example of this ignorance must be the people who design the seats on airplanes. At the other extreme, the people who have the most accurate, vivid sense of their own appearance may be dancers. What dancers look like is, after all, what they do.”

    — Ursula Le Guin, in The Wave in the Mind (via fortooate)

    carry-on-my-wayward-wesley

    This paragraph went in so many different directions before it ended. What the fuck Ursula

    nec-sanguinis-atramento

    Tf are they talking about

    How to Deal with Disappointment

    1. Accept the reality of what has happened.
    2. Accept and experience the full negative emotional impact. For example, it’s likely to damage your self-confidence and undermine your self-esteem. You are also likely to experience loss.
    3. Talk about it with people who understand and care. This will help you to process the negative emotions so you can start to heal and move on with your life.
    4. Change the way you think about yourself and the negative experience. See it as something you can learn and grow from – and not as something that destroys your life.
    5. “When one door closes another opens” so get back in the game and embrace life again. Set yourself new goals, and embrace a dream again. Something even better may be waiting for you! (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

    Within time I'll be able to look at myself in the mirror again.

    Check yourself.

    Sometimes you are the toxic person.

    Sometimes you are the mean, negative person you’re looking to push away.

    Sometimes the problem is you.

    And that doesn’t make you less worthy.

    Keep on growing.

    Keep on checking yourself.

    Keep on motivating yourself.

    Mistakes are opportunities.

    Look at them, own them, grow from them and move on.

    Do better, be better.

    you’re human. it’s okay. (via oaluz)