@the-blue-phantom
I grew tall to fill the void
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Last update
2020-11-23 19:11:05
    katy-l-wood

    Look at this utterly ridiculous rich person house.

    …I want it.

    “The sides of the tunnel and pond are decorated with fossils and shells (some faux, some real) in the concrete walls,” Casey told Scuba Diving in an email. “In the pond, there is one large statue in the middle, plus additional artifacts, treasure chests, [and] petrified wood.”

    I REALLY want it.

    citizen-zero

    Whatever rich person built this house can have a little validity, as a treat for actually building a cool ass fucking house instead of yet another boring sterile minimalist mansion

    the-goblin-cat

    Finally, a rich person that’s normal

    PLEASE tell me that i did a good job on my powerpoint

    i went to an ENTIRE WEEK of business school for this

    tonyglowheart

    LEVERAGE?????

    dirtydirtychai

    i love everyone in this gastropub 

    ttsreina

    @greenbergsays !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    greenbergsays

    THE GODS HAVE BLESSED US THIS DAY

    “Schools worldwide have closed as communities respond to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. But students are finding other ways to connect online; one way is through Minecraft, which now has new, free educational content available on Minecraft Marketplace.

    Xbox head Phil Spencer addressed the Minecraft community on Tuesday, announcing a new Education category in the marketplace, designed to help students now at home.

    With the new educational content, players can “explore the International Space Station through a partnership with NASA, learn to code with a robot, visit famous Washington D.C. landmarks, find and build 3D fractals, [and] learn what it’s like to be a marine biologist.” All this content — and more — will be available through June 30, Spencer said.”

    Read the full piece here

    libertybill

    Cant wait

    ricketricket

    any day now

    WOLVES ARE BACK! WOLVES ARE BACK! WOLVES ARE BACK!

    We’ll also have an official vote in the next election for intentionally reintroducing wolves in the state, though I’m curious how that will be effected by the conformation of this pack.

    Either way, we have official conformation that a very important part of our ecosystem is coming back one way or another and I am THRILLED. We’ve had plenty of lone wolves over the years, but to have an official pack is fantastic news.

    “Porfa please. Pero like. Janguear (to hang out).

    These Spanglish phrases are all the results of contact between Spanish and English. In a Texas college classroom, students are learning that Spanglish — a version of Spanish that’s influenced by English — is just as valid as any other Spanish dialect.

    “What history teaches us is that the only constant is change,” explains Meghann Peace, who teaches this class primarily in Spanish at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio. “When two or more languages are in constant geographic and social contact, there will always be linguistic consequences.”

    And yet Spanglish, or U.S. Spanish, is sometimes looked down upon by native speakers of both languages. Even in a state like Texas, where nearly 30% of the population speaks Spanish at home, there’s a perception that it’s better to speak “pure Spanish.”

    Peace is teaching her students — who mostly grew up speaking a mix of Spanish and English — to challenge those negative perceptions.”

    Originated by @axellenobody  in this reddit thread - “I have a few players in my games that have various degrees of Dyslexia, and one of them - u/Axelle123 - worked with me to make a Character Sheet that’s helped several of my players read and comprehend what’s going on on the character sheets…”

    Personally I think that these sheets look exciting and fun to play even if you don’t have dyslexia, everyone should use ‘em!

    (Also, check out the use of Comic Sans, a notably dyslexia-friendly font, in action!)

    the-rain-monster

    A NYC grad student working on food stamps for her thesis has released a free cookbook for those living on $4/day.

    vastderp

    SIG NAL BOO OO OO OOOST

    isozyme

    oooooh this is so nice!

    ransomdracalis

    I believe it’s important to eat well, even when you’re strapped for cash. It’s good for your health and energy! This cookbook is full of delicious and healthy recipes, the ingredients of which are fairly inexpensive.

    fuckingrecipes

    I ACKNOWLEDGE THIS WOMAN AS A FELLOW WARRIOR AND A FANTASTIC HUMAN BEING. 

    fleetfootfox

    Boost so hard. Feeding yourself well is a challenge when you”ve got little income

    vrabia

    I HAVE BEEN USING THIS COOKBOOK FOR MONTHS AND IT’S AMAZING 100/10 RECOMMENDING EVERYWHERE

    (just to give you an idea, my food budget is 30 euro/week at most [about $38] and I have to maintain a healthy diet due to weird medication side-effects and yeah, basically this book is a lifesaver if you’re broke but need to watch what you’re eating)

    adramofpoison

    Reblog to save a life. Because it’s easy to find food for $4/day, but most of it tends to be garden variety junkfood

    keypriest

    this was a long undertaking but i’m beyond excited to post what i believe is the most comprehensive daemon-finding quiz to date, featuring 34 categories of animals and 279 total possible outcomes! from insects to owls to seals to wild cats, you’re sure to find a unique result that fits your personality.

    tag or comment what your daemon would be! :) mine’s a cocker spaniel!

    EDIT: the quiz has two parts, the category which this post links to (34 options), and then the specific animal within that category (5-15 options) which you’re linked to once you get your result!

    For years now, former Archie Sonic writer Ken Penders has been most well known for his legal battles with Archie and Sega in which he acquired the rights to his characters and stories. Among dedicated Sonic fans, he’s also known for his bad tweets and strange art style.

    You know what doesn’t come up as often? The actual content of his stories.

    Sure, everyone vaguely knows the Archie comics are weird, and it’s easy to find goofy out-of-context panels. But that’s only skimming the surface. What’s up with the bizarre recurring themes in his stories? The obsession with asshole dads? The weird attempts at mature themes? Dingo firing squads executing civilians? A cartoon bee dying from eating an LSD-laced chili dog? Distasteful allusions to the Holocaust? Implications that teenage Sonic characters were having sex off-screen? Why did any of this happen?

    Few can answer this, because few want to analyze over 100 issues of mediocre furry soap opera comics with bad politics. I mean, there’s no shortage of good Sonic comics you could read instead. Who would be stupid enough to do that?

    Me. My name is Bobby Schroeder, and I’m stupid enough.

    Five years ago, I started a blog to archive my journey through Archie Sonic. I jokingly gave it the name Thanks, Ken Penders.” Now, in 2019, I’ve finally finished reading every issue the man ever wrote for Sonic the Hedgehog and its spinoffs. To close out this first leg of my journey, I’d like to take some time to summarize what the fuck is up with Ken Penders’ bizarre Sonic comics.

    Read the full article on Medium

    squeeful

    For years, this has frustrated Ellen Buchanan Weiss, whose toddler son is mixed race. She’s tried searching for photographs online to reference conditions such as chicken pox and hives, but tells me that “even adding the qualifier ‘chicken pox on black child’ yields mostly Caucasian examples.” Recently, she decided to do something to help other parents facing similar barriers, and began collecting photos on her own. Her project Brown Skin Matters is an Instagram account filled with reference images of dermatological conditions on non-white skin. You can see what ant bites can look like on a child who is Hispanic and black. Or how the viral illness Fifths disease can manifest in a child who is black and white.

    From the photos, it’s clear that conditions look different on different skin tones. On a post featuring a black child with chicken pox, one person commented: “Thank you! My mom (white) always said she wasn’t sure if we’d actually had chicken pox because they didn’t look how she expected. But the pediatrician said we did.”

    While Weiss is not a medical professional, she is working with physicians to review the viewer-submitted photos. She emphasizes that the information on Brown Skin Matters is for educational and reference purposes only, and not a diagnosis. “I’m just a regular person who dearly loves her son and wants equitable representation and resources available to him and other people who look like him,” Weiss says.

    goldhornsandblackwool

    This is awesome bc there are SO many conditions that are given symptoms like ‘pink/flushed/redness’ and that doesn’t look the same at all on brown skin. Sometimes you can see the redness, sometimes you can’t, sometimes the inflammation actually triggers our skin to protect the damaged tissue from the sun by developing MORE melanin.

    keypriest
    emotionalabuseawareness

    When confronted about her inability to respect her daughter’s boundaries, all hell would break loose. Tyler’s mom would recount every dollar spent, every stretch mark borne, every night spent sleepless, every sacrifice made to give her daughter a decent upbringing. How dare she be so ungrateful? Especially since she was the parent that stayed, unlike Tyler’s chronically absent father. Wasn’t she owed something for that?

    gatheringbones

    “Most of us wouldn’t think twice about a child consoling their parent through a tough time, but when it becomes normal for consolation to flow from child to parent, children begin to understand that maintaining Mommy’s or Daddy’s well-being is a responsibility that falls heavily on them. Let’s be clear: Our emotions are not other people’s responsibility, and we learn that by watching our parents model healthy emotional expression and maturity. When our parents miss the mark, we struggle with emotional intelligence and accountability. Every time we dump our adult-sized baggage on our children or make them referees in an adult conflict, we teach them that other people are at the helm of our stability and happiness. As they navigate the dating pool, they’ll either seek out relationships with emotionally unavailable people or avoid intimacy altogether. They become adults who are more caregivers than self-lovers, or who use other people as their emotional asylums — a danger either way.”

    Feb 25, 2013

    I’m always kind of loath to make me seem like I’ve been a controversial author, because there’s real controversy and then there are just silly people objecting to things. But the closest I got to real controversy was in high school, Lowell High School in San Francisco, Calif. There was an experiment going on where [students] took a long career test where we had to say what we wanted to be when we grew up. Then, we took a test of our abilities and interests and the computer spat out a list of things we were suited for. Then we took the first part of the test again to see if the test changed what we wanted to be when we grew up. The first part of the test listed every possible occupation you could imagine, and you had to fill in, with a number 2 pencil, the little bubble. My friend David and I, in our homeroom where we were taking the test, got everyone to fill in the bubble marked “other” … and then we all wrote in “pirate,” because we thought that was funny–and it was funny. The principal looked at these oddball results of the test because it looked like [students] wanted to be different things, and then [students] took a career test and suddenly everyone wanted to be a pirate in a particular homeroom. The principal knew immediately that it was me, just from looking. He called me in [to his office] and he said, “I know it’s you. Don’t deny it. You made everybody be a pirate.” And I said, “I want to be a pirate. I can’t help it if everyone else in my homeroom wants to be a pirate. That’s life.” As it turned out, the school was spearheading some kind of study, so that our meager results for the 3,000 kids in the school were actually going to represent something statewide. I’d managed to throw off some huge study because some sizeable portion of America’s youth now were saying they wanted to be pirates, and he was furious with me. I was proud of myself for sticking to my guns, for saying that, “I want to be a pirate. It’s not a prank. I’m very interested in piracy. I didn’t realize that everyone else in my homeroom also wants to be a pirate. But that’s life. You should report that, whatever, 8 percent of American youth are interested in piracy.”

    It’s a question repeatedly asked in hospitals and medical clinics: rate your pain on a scale from one to 10.

    For registered nurse Athanasius Sylliboy, he wants his peers to know that if they’re asking a Mi'kmaw patient that, they won’t get an accurate answer.

    “In Mi'kmaq, we don’t have a word for pain. We only have descriptions of pain,” he said. “So, if you’re asking me zero to 10, what’s your pain? And I have no concept or idea what pain actually means, it’s not really appropriate.”

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